Vitamina D – O tratamento

Vitamina D

Por uma outra terapia

http://vitaminadporumaoutraterapia.wordpress.com

O tratamento.

As doses de vitamina D devem ser acertadas individualmente considerando diversos fatores e, portanto, o tratamento deve ser realizado necessariamente sob supervisão médica.

Todo o hormônio tomado em doses acima daquelas acertadas individualmente pode provocar reações adversas, e a vitamina D não é exceção. Se não administradas corretamente, doses superiores a 10.000 UI (Unidades Internacionais) podem causar danos irreversíveis a função renal, entre outras complicações.

Alguns médicos já adotaram a metodologia do doutor Cícero Coimbra e a utilizam com pacientes portadores de doenças autoimunitárias. Aqui, você pode encontrar alguns dos médicos que já realizam esse tratamento no Brasil.

É importante ressaltar que não é necessário abandonar nenhum outro tratamento (nem mesmo os imunomoduladores) para que o paciente se beneficie com o tratamento da vitamina D. O que acontece é que muitos pacientes se sentem inseguros no início, mas com o tempo acabam deixando as injeções de lado por dois motivos principais: pelo desconforto em tomar esses medicamentos ininterruptamente, mas, principalmente, pela maior efetividade da vitamina D na proteção do sistema imunológico.

Instituto de Autoimunidade

O doutor Cícero está trabalhando, ao lado de alguns pacientes que se beneficiaram deste tratamento, para a criação de uma associação sem fins lucrativos chamada de Instituto de Investigação e Tratamento de Autoimunidade. Seu objetivo primordial é a promoção de atendimento médico para portadores de doenças autoimunitárias, viabilizando o atendimento gratuito aos portadores com baixa renda.

O Instituto ainda não foi criado efetivamente por falta de investimentos, que serão necessários para pagar, a princípio, o espaço, atendimento médico especializado e os serviços de diagnóstico e monitoramento para os pacientes. No momento, o doutor Cícero reserva parte do seu horário de atendimento para receber pacientes gratuitamente em seu consultório pelo Instituto, mas infelizmente a enorme demanda está longe de ser atendida da maneira ideal.

Para entender melhor o tratamento e a proposta do doutor Cícero Coimbra, leia o texto Por um novo paradigma de conduta e tratamento.

fonte

http://vitaminadporumaoutraterapia.wordpress.com/o-tratamento/

The Nutrition Source – Vitamin D and Health

The Nutrition Source

Vitamin D and Health

 

Table of Contents

Low Vitamin D: A Global Concern

The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) recommended daily intake of vitamin D is 600 IU for people ages 1 to 70, and 800 IU after age 70. (7) Yet this is overly conservative, since the best available evidence shows optimal intakes are higher, at least 800–1,000 IU for adults.

In extremely high doses—hundreds of thousands of IU or more—vitamin D is toxic and can even cause death. But in children over the age of 9 and in adults, taking up to 4,000 IU per day as a supplement is safe; ages 4 to 8, up to 3,000 IU; ages 1 to 3, 2,500 IU; ages 6 to 12 months, up to 1,500 IU; and ages 0 to 6 months, up to 1,000 IU. (7)

Many people may need 2,000 IU per day (or more) for adequate blood levels, particularly if they have darker skin, spend winters at higher latitudes (such as the northern U.S.), or spend little time in the sun. If you fall into one of these groups, which would include most of the U.S. population, taking 2,000 IU is reasonable and well within the safe range for adults. As always, it’s a good idea to discuss use of supplements with your doctor, and he or she may want to order a vitamin D blood test.

To prevent rickets, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends vitamin D supplements of 400 IU per day for breastfed infants, and also for non-breastfed infants and children who do not drink at least a liter of vitamin D fortified milk each day. (6)  Infants and children at high risk of deficiency—those who are born premature, have dark skin, or live at high latitudes—may need supplements of up to 800 IU per day, especially in the winter.

If you live north of the line connecting San Francisco to Philadelphia and Athens to Beijing, odds are that you don’t get enough vitamin D. The same holds true if you don’t get outside for at least a 15-minute daily walk in the sun. African-Americans and others with dark skin, as well as older individuals, tend to have much lower levels of vitamin D, as do people who are overweight or obese.

Worldwide, inadequate vitamin D is common, and deficiencies can be found on all continents, in all ethnic groups, and across all ages. Some surveys suggest that perhaps half of the world’s population has inadequate blood levels of vitamin D. (13)  Indeed, in industrialized countries, doctors are even seeing the resurgence of rickets, the bone-weakening disease that had been largely eradicated through vitamin D fortification. (46)

Why are these widespread low levels of vitamin D such a great concern? Because research conducted over the past decade suggests that vitamin D plays a much broader disease-fighting role than once thought.

Being “D-ficient” may increase the risk of a host of chronic diseases, such as osteoporosis, heart disease, some cancers, and multiple sclerosis, as well as infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis and even the seasonal flu.

Currently, there’s scientific debate about how much vitamin D people need each day. The Institute of Medicine (IOM), in a long-awaited report released in November 2010 recommends increasing the daily vitamin D intake for children and adults in the U.S. and Canada, to 600 IU per day for people ages 1 to 70, and 800 IU for people over age 70. (7) The report also recognized the safety of vitamin D by increasing the upper limit from 2,000 to 4,000 IU per day, and acknowledged that even at 4,000 IU per day, there was no good evidence of harm.

The new guidelines, however, are overly conservative about the recommended intake, and they do not give enough weight to some of the latest science on vitamin D and health. For bone health and chronic disease prevention, many people are likely to need more vitamin D than even these new government guidelines recommend.

 

Vitamin D Sources and Function

Vitamin D is both a nutrient we eat and a hormone our bodies make. Few foods are naturally rich in vitamin D, so the biggest dietary sources of vitamin D are fortified foods and vitamin supplements.

VITAMIN D FROM FOOD AND SUPLEMENTS

Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D. Good sources include dairy products and breakfast cereals (both of which are fortified with vitamin D), and fatty fish such as salmon and tuna.

For most people, the best way to get enough vitamin D is taking a supplement, but the level in most multivitamins (400 IU) is too low. Encouragingly, some manufacturers have begun adding 800 or 1,000 IU of vitamin D to their standard multivitamin preparations. If the multivitamin you take does not have 800 or 1,000 IU of vitamin D, you may want to consider adding a separate vitamin D supplement, especially if you don’t spend much time in the sun. Talk to your healthcare provider.

The body also manufactures vitamin D from cholesterol, through a process triggered by the action of sunlight on skin, hence its nickname, “the sunshine vitamin.”  Yet many people do not make enough vitamin D from the sun, among them, people who have a darker skin tone, who are overweight, who are older, and who cover up when they are in the sun. (1)

Correctly applied sunscreen reduces our ability to absorb vitamin D by more than 90 percent. (8) And not all sunlight is created equal: The sun’s ultraviolet B (UVB) rays—the so-called “tanning” rays, and the rays that trigger the skin to produce vitamin D—are stronger near the equator and weaker at higher latitudes. So in the fall and winter, people who live at higher latitudes (in the northern U.S. and Europe, for example) can’t make much if any vitamin D from the sun. (8)

 

Read more: what may increase your risk for low vitamin D

Vitamin D helps ensure that the body absorbs and retains calcium and phosphorus, both critical for building bone. Laboratory studies show that vitamin D can reduce cancer cell growth, can increase muscle strength and reduce falls in older people, and plays a critical role in controlling infections. Many of the body’s organs and tissues have receptors for vitamin D, and scientists are still teasing out its other possible functions.

 

New Vitamin D Research: Beyond Building Bones

Several promising areas of vitamin D research look far beyond vitamin D’s role in building bones. And, as you might expect, the news media release a flurry of reports every time another study links vitamin D to some new ailment. These reports can be confusing, however, because some studies are stronger than others, and any report needs to be interpreted in the light of all other evidence. More answers may come from randomized trials, such as the VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL), which will enroll 20,000 healthy men and women to see if taking 2,000 IU of vitamin D or 1,000 mg of fish oil daily lowers the risk of cancer, heart disease, and stroke.

Here, we provide an overview of some of the more promising areas of vitamin D research, highlighting the complex role of vitamin D in disease prevention—and the many unanswered questions that remain.

 

Vitamin D and Bone and Muscle Strength

Vitamin D plays a definite role in bone health and reducing fractures; the central issue is, what is the minimum dose that is effective? Several randomized trials have shown that vitamin D supplementation prevents fractures—as long as it is taken in a high enough dose. (913)

 

NUTRITION IN-DEPTH

 

Why to Avoid Super High Doses of Vitamin D

A recent vitamin D trial drew headlines for its unexpected finding that a very high dose of vitamin D increased fracture and fall risk in older women. (18) The trial’s vitamin D dose—500,000 IU taken by mouth on a single day, once a year—was much higher than previously tested in an annual regimen.

There’s strong evidence that more moderate doses of vitamin D taken daily or weekly protect against fractures and falls—and are safe. Read more about this study’s findings, and why it makes sense to stick to more moderate vitamin D doses and avoid single, super high doses.

A summary of the evidence comes from a combined analysis of 12 fracture prevention trials that included more than 40,000 elderly people, most of them women. Researchers found that high intakes of vitamin D supplements—of about 800 IU per day—reduced hip and non-spine fractures by over 20 percent, while lower intakes (400 IU or less) failed to offer any fracture prevention benefit. (13)

Vitamin D may also help increase muscle strength, which in turn helps to prevent falls, a common problem that leads to substantial disability and death in older people. (1416)  Once again, vitamin D dose matters: A combined analysis of multiple studies found that taking 700 to 1,000 IU of vitamin D per day lowered the risk of falls by 19 percent, but taking 200 to 600 IU per day did not offer any such protection. (17)

Based on these fall- and fracture-prevention findings, the International Osteoporosis Foundation recommends that adults over age 60 aim for vitamin D blood levels of 30 ng/ml. (52) Most people will need vitamin D supplements of at least 800 to 1,000 IU per day, and possibly higher, to reach these levels.

 

Vitamin D and Heart Disease

The heart is basically a large muscle, and like skeletal muscle, it has receptors for vitamin D. (19) So perhaps it’s no surprise that studies are finding that inadequate vitamin D may be linked to heart disease. The Health Professional Follow-Up Study checked the vitamin D blood levels in nearly 50,000 men who were healthy, and then followed them for 10 years. (20) They found that men who were low in vitamin D were twice as likely to have a heart attack as men who had adequate levels of vitamin D. Other studies have found that low vitamin D levels were associated with higher risk of heart failure, sudden cardiac death, stroke, overall cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular death. (2124) How exactly might vitamin D help prevent heart disease? There’s evidence that vitamin D plays a role in controlling blood pressure and preventing artery damage, and this may explain these findings. (25) Still, more research is needed before we can be confident of these benefits.

 

Vitamin D and Cancer

Nearly 30 years ago, researchers noticed an intriguing relationship between colon cancer deaths and geographic location: People who lived at higher latitudes, such as in the northern U.S., had higher rates of death from colon cancer than people who live closer to the equator. (26) The sun’s UVB rays are weaker at higher latitudes, and in turn, people’s vitamin D levels in these high latitude locales tend to be lower. This led to the hypothesis that low vitamin D levels might somehow increase colon cancer risk. (26)

 

Vitamin D and Geographic Location

Many scientific hypotheses about vitamin D and disease stem from studies that have compared solar radiation and disease rates in different countries. These can be a good starting point for other research but don’t provide the most definitive information…. Read more about vitamin D studies and geographic location.

Since then, dozens of studies suggest an association between low vitamin D levels and increased risks of colon and other cancers. (1,27)  The evidence is strongest for colorectal cancer, with observational studies consistently finding that the lower the vitamin D levels, the higher the risk is of these diseases. (2838) Vitamin D levels may also predict cancer survival, but evidence for this is still limited. (27) Yet finding such associations does not necessarily mean that taking vitamin D supplements will lower cancer risk.

The VITAL trial will look specifically at whether vitamin D supplements lower cancer risk. It will be years, though, before it releases any results. It could also fail to detect a real benefit of vitamin D, for several reasons: If people in the placebo group decide on their own to take vitamin D supplements, that could minimize any differences between the placebo group and the supplement group; the study may not follow participants for a long enough time to show a cancer prevention benefit; or study participants may be starting supplements too late in life to lower their cancer risk. In the meantime, based on the evidence to date, 16 scientists have circulated a “call for action” on vitamin D and cancer prevention: (27) Given the high rates of vitamin D inadequacy in North America, the strong evidence for reduction of osteoporosis and fractures, the potential cancer-fighting benefits of vitamin D, and the low risk of vitamin D supplementation, they recommend widespread vitamin D supplementation of 2,000 IU per day. (27) The

Canadian Cancer Society has also recommended that Canadian adults consider taking vitamin D supplements of 1,000 IU per day during the fall and winter; people who are at high risk of having low vitamin D levels (because they are older, have dark skin, spend little time in the sun, or cover up when they go outside) should consider taking supplements year round. (53)

 

Read more: vitamin D trials for cancer prevention

 

Vitamin D and Immune Function

Vitamin D’s role in regulating the immune system has led scientists to explore two parallel research paths: Does low vitamin D contribute to the development of multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and other so-called “autoimmune” diseases, where the body’s immune system attacks its own organs and tissues? And could vitamin D supplements help boost our body’s defenses to fight infectious disease, such as tuberculosis and seasonal flu? This is a hot research area and more findings will be emerging.

 

Vitamin D and Multiple Sclerosis: Multiple sclerosis (MS) rates are much higher far north (or far south) of the equator than in sunnier climes, and researchers suspect that chronic vitamin D inadequacy may be one reason why. One prospective study to look at this question found that among white men and women, those with the highest vitamin D blood levels had a 62 percent lower risk of developing MS than those with the lowest vitamin D levels. (39) The study didn’t find this effect among black men and women, most likely because there were fewer black study participants and most of them had low vitamin D levels, making it harder to find any link between vitamin D and MS if one exists.

 

Vitamin D and Type 1 Diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is another disease that varies with geography—a child in Finland is about 400 times more likely to develop it than a child in Venezuela. (40) Evidence that vitamin D may play a role in preventing type 1 diabetes comes from a 30-year study that followed more than 10,000 Finnish children from birth: Children who regularly received vitamin D supplements during infancy had a nearly 90 percent lower risk of developing type 1 diabetes than those who did not receive supplements. (41)  Other European case-control studies, when analyzed together, also suggest that vitamin D may help protect against type 1 diabetes. (42) No randomized controlled trials have tested this notion, and it is not clear that they would be possible to conduct.

 

Vitamin D, the Flu, and the Common Cold: The flu virus wreaks the most havoc in the winter, abating in the summer months. This seasonality led a British doctor to hypothesize that a sunlight-related “seasonal stimulus” triggered influenza outbreaks. (43) More than 20 years after this initial hypothesis, several scientists published a paper suggesting that vitamin D may be the seasonal stimulus. (44) Among the evidence they cite:

  • Vitamin D levels are lowest in the winter months. (44) 

  • The active form of vitamin D tempers the damaging inflammatory response of some white blood cells, while it also boosts immune cells’ production of microbe-fighting proteins. (44) 

  • Children who have vitamin D-deficiency rickets are more likely to get respiratory infections, while children exposed to sunlight seem to have fewer respiratory infections. (44) 

  • Adults who have low vitamin D levels are more likely to report having had a recent cough, cold, or upper respiratory tract infection. (45)

A recent randomized controlled trial in Japanese school children tested whether taking daily vitamin D supplements would prevent seasonal flu. (46) The trial followed nearly 340 children for four months during the height of the winter flu season. Half of the study participants received pills that contained 1,200 IU of vitamin D; the other half received placebo pills. Researchers found that type A influenza rates in the vitamin D group were about 40 percent lower than in the placebo group; there was no significant difference in type B influenza rates. This was a small but promising study, and more research is needed before we can definitively say that vitamin D protects against the flu. But don’t skip your flu shot, even if vitamin D has some benefit.

 

Vitamin D and Tuberculosis: Before the advent of antibiotics, sunlight and sun lamps were part of the standard treatment for tuberculosis (TB). (47) More recent research suggests that the “sunshine vitamin” may be linked to TB risk. Several case-control studies, when analyzed together, suggest that people diagnosed with tuberculosis have lower vitamin D levels than healthy people of similar age and other characteristics. (48)   Such studies do not follow individuals over time, so they cannot tell us whether low vitamin D levels led to the increased TB risk or whether taking vitamin D supplements would prevent TB. There are also genetic differences in the receptor that binds vitamin D, and these differences may influence TB risk. (49) Again, more research is needed. (49)

 

Vitamin D and Risk of Premature Death

A promising report in the Archives of Internal Medicine suggests that taking vitamin D supplements may even reduce overall mortality rates: A combined analysis of multiple studies found that taking modest levels of vitamin D supplements was associated with a statistically significant 7 percent reduction in mortality from any cause. (50) The analysis looked at the findings from 18 randomized controlled trials that enrolled a total of nearly 60,000 study participants; most of the study participants took between 400 and 800 IU of vitamin D per day for an average of five years. Keep in mind that this analysis has several limitations, chief among them the fact that the studies it included were not designed to explore mortality in general, or explore specific causes of death. More research is needed before any broad claims can be made about vitamin D and mortality. (51)

 

Why the IOM’s Vitamin D Recommendation Falls Short

Taken together, these disparate studies on bone health, heart disease, cancer, immune function, and early death add up to a powerful conclusion: Many people do not get enough vitamin D to protect their bones and minimize risk of falling—and taking vitamin D supplements of 1,000 to 2,000 IU per day would be a safe way to do both. This alone is good reason to consider taking a vitamin D supplement of 1,000 to 2,000 IU per day, and there is a strong likelihood of other benefits, even if not yet proven. Yet the IOM added up the evidence and reached a different conclusion—that children and most adults in the U.S. and Canada only need 600 IU of vitamin D a day. While the report notes that the 600 IU can come from food, supplements, or a combination of both, it acknowledges that very few Americans reach this intake.  Despite this, the committee recommended supplements for only a few special groups. There are several reasons why the IOM’s recommendation falls short:

 

Too Narrow a View of the Scientific Evidence

When evaluating the evidence on vitamin D, the IOM gave randomized clinical trials the most weight, since, in theory, such trials are the most rigorous: Researchers that randomly assign study participants to receive a treatment, such as a vitamin supplement, or a sugar pill (placebo), can be more certain that the treatment itself is responsible for any results.

But in reality, randomized clinical trials do not always offer the best evidence on vitamin supplements and health: They are expensive to conduct, so often they last only a few years, and they tend to enroll people who are already at a high risk of disease—for example, people who are older or who are not in the best health. As a result, these trials may be too short or too late in life to show the benefit of a vitamin supplement, if one exists.

Cohort studies can overcome some of the shortcomings of clinical trials, since they can follow large groups of initially-healthy people for long periods of time—long enough for links between vitamin levels and disease risks to emerge. Laboratory studies and animal studies also help fill in the research picture.
Most of the randomized trials of vitamin D have focused on bone health, and there’s been a lack of randomized trials on vitamin D and other chronic diseases. Unfortunately, the IOM committee interpreted this lack of trials as evidence of no benefit—in effect, ignoring the substantial evidence from cohort and other studies that vitamin D plays an important role in lowering the risk of several chronic diseases.

Based on this limited view, the IOM determined that most Americans have adequate blood levels of vitamin D—at least 20 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL) or higher. Yet there’s much evidence that higher blood levels—on the order of 30 ng/mL—would do a better job of protecting bones, may help lower the risk of colon cancer and a host of diseases, and are safe. The safest and easiest way to achieve such blood levels is to take a supplement that contains at least 800 to 1,000 IU of vitamin D a day, and for people at high risk of low vitamin D levels, 2,000 IU a day.

 

Read more: why the IOM’s updated vitamin D and calcium guidelines are too low in vitamin D and too high in calcium for bone health

 

Too Hesitant on Vitamin D Supplements

Even if you accept the IOM’s lower criteria for adequate vitamin D blood levels (20 ng/mL)—and accept its findings that 600 IU of vitamin D per day is enough for most people to reach these blood levels—the report’s tepid recommendations on vitamin D supplements just do not make sense.

Q. What type of vitamin D is best?

Two forms of vitamin D are used in supplements: vitamin D2 (“ergocalciferol,” or pre-vitamin D) and vitamin D3 (“cholecalciferol”). Vitamin D3 is chemically indistinguishable from the form of vitamin D produced in the body…. Read more about what type of vitamin D is best.

 

The report recommends supplements for breastfed infants (and, especially, breastfed infants who have dark skin), since they are at high risk of deficiency. It also says that frail elderly who live in institutions should be monitored for vitamin D nutrition, and that a vitamin D “supplement is also an option” for people who do not eat dairy or animal products. But it does not explicitly advocate supplements for the population at large, or for other groups who are at risk of low vitamin D levels, such as people who are obese, who have dark skin, or who spend their winters in the northern states.

Yet data included with the IOM report, based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (which includes a representative sample of Americans), finds that 11 percent of European-Americans and 54 percent of African-Americans have blood vitamin D levels below 20 ng/mL. That means, in effect, that tens of millions of Americans have low vitamin D blood levels. These percentages would be even higher if one-third of Americans were not already taking vitamin D supplements in their multivitamins, and if the national survey had included winter samples from people living in the Northern states, since vitamin D levels are low at that time of year.

Very few Americans get the recommended 600 IU of vitamin D per day from food alone. The IOM committee acknowledges this—yet still concludes that Americans meet “average requirements” for vitamin D.  (Even the rationale for recommending 600 IU per day to achieve the low bar of 20 ng/mL is based on a flawed analysis by the IOM committee that considered the average blood level for a population; if the average is at 20 ng/mL, half of the population will be below that level. )

So how are Americans getting their vitamin D? The committee speculates that people get “at least some vitamin D from inadvertent or deliberate sun exposure.” Unprotected sun exposure, though, can increase the risk of skin cancer, and generally, it’s not recommended as a way to obtain vitamin D. Given that, it does not make sense for the committee to recommend a vitamin D intake that most people cannot get through food—while at the same time, giving only minimal guidance on who might really need vitamin D supplements.

 

Overstated Concern about High Vitamin D Blood Levels

In addition to understating the potential benefits of vitamin D and the need for supplements, the IOM overstated the concerns about having too-high blood levels of vitamin D.  For example, when the IOM committee looked at the relationship between vitamin D blood levels and premature death, it focused on data showing that at very high vitamin D blood levels—upwards of 70 ng/mL—mortality rates rise slightly. It glossed over data showing that mortality rates steadily drop as vitamin D levels rise, at least up to 40 ng/mL, and perhaps beyond: Since relatively few people have vitamin D levels higher than 40 ng/mL, there is not as much mortality data for levels in the 40–70 ng/mL range. Most studies suggest mortality continues to decrease—or does not increase—in the 40–70 ng/mL range, but a few studies have shown an increased mortality within this range.

As if to further justify its cautionary tone on vitamin D, the IOM’s press release pointed to other vitamin supplements—antioxidants like beta carotene and vitamin E, for example—that initially seemed promising for disease prevention but failed to pan out (and, sometimes, seemed to cause harm) in clinical trials. (54) Here too, though, the IOM’s logic is flawed: Beta carotene and vitamin E trials tested extremely high doses of those vitamins—ten to twenty times higher than what one might naturally get from a healthy diet. Vitamin D, though, is a different story: Spending a short time in the summer sun can produce the equivalent of 10,000 IU or more of vitamin D, and our evolutionary ancestors (who spent more time outdoors than we do, with less clothing) surely had much higher vitamin D levels than we typically have now.  By comparison, a vitamin D supplement of 1,000 to 2,000 IU a day is a very modest dose, and may be lower than optimal.

 

The Bottom Line: Many People Need Extra Vitamin D

Based on the evidence to date, it’s clear that many people don’t get enough vitamin D to protect their health. The International Osteoporosis Federation’s vitamin D recommendations, (52) though developed to prevent fall and fractures in older adults, offer a solid, evidence-based guidepost for younger and middle-aged adults, too: Taking a vitamin D supplement of 800 to 1,000 IU per day will help people, on average, achieve adequate blood levels of vitamin D (30 ng/mL). These vitamin D amounts are safe, falling well below the newly raised vitamin D upper limit of 4,000 IU per day—and they are easy to achieve, since more and more multivitamins now contain 800 to 1,000 IU of vitamin D. If your vitamin contains only 400 IU of vitamin D, consider adding an extra vitamin D supplement. People who are at high risk of deficiency, including people with darker skin, who are obese, or who spend little time in the sun, may need 2,000 IU of vitamin D (or more) to achieve adequate levels in the blood. If you fall into one of these groups, taking 2,000 IU of vitamin D each day is reasonable—and it’s an amount that falls well within the safe range. As always, it’s a good idea to discuss use of supplements with your doctor, and he or she may want to order a vitamin D blood test.

What makes the most sense from a public health point of view? It would be expensive to test everyone’s vitamin D blood levels, especially since the tests would need to be repeated seasonally. While people can make vitamin D from the sun, getting too much sun increases the risk of skin cancer, so it’s just not the best way to get vitamin D. By comparison, vitamin D supplements of 800 to 1,000 IU per day are inexpensive and safe—and provide a reasonable approach to avoiding D-ficiency.

 

References

1. Holick MF. Vitamin D deficiency. N Engl J Med. 2007; 357:266-81.

2. Gordon CM, DePeter KC, Feldman HA, Grace E, Emans SJ. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among healthy adolescents. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2004; 158:531-7.

3. Lips P. Worldwide status of vitamin D nutrition. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2010; 121:297-300.

4. Robinson PD, Hogler W, Craig ME, et al. The re-emerging burden of rickets: a decade of experience from Sydney. Arch Dis Child. 2006; 91:564-8.

5. Kreiter SR, Schwartz RP, Kirkman HN, Jr., Charlton PA, Calikoglu AS, Davenport ML. Nutritional rickets in African American breast-fed infants. J Pediatr. 2000; 137:153-7.

6. Misra M, Pacaud D, Petryk A, Collett-Solberg PF, Kappy M. Vitamin D deficiency in children and its management: review of current knowledge and recommendations. Pediatrics. 2008; 122:398-417.

7. Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D. Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press, 2010.

8. Holick MF. Vitamin D: importance in the prevention of cancers, type 1 diabetes, heart disease, and osteoporosis. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004; 79:362-71.

9. Boonen S, Lips P, Bouillon R, Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Vanderschueren D, Haentjens P. Need for additional calcium to reduce the risk of hip fracture with vitamin d supplementation: evidence from a comparative metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007; 92:1415-23.

10. Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Willett WC, Wong JB, Giovannucci E, Dietrich T, Dawson-Hughes B. Fracture prevention with vitamin D supplementation: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. JAMA. 2005; 293:2257-64.

11. Cauley JA, Lacroix AZ, Wu L, et al. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and risk for hip fractures. Ann Intern Med. 2008; 149:242-50.

12. Cauley JA, Parimi N, Ensrud KE, et al. Serum 25 HydroxyVitamin D and the Risk of Hip and Non-spine Fractures in Older Men. J Bone Miner Res. 2009.

13. Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Willett WC, Wong JB, et al. Prevention of nonvertebral fractures with oral vitamin D and dose dependency: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Arch Intern Med. 2009; 169:551-61.

14. Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Dawson-Hughes B, Willett WC, et al. Effect of Vitamin D on falls: a meta-analysis. JAMA. 2004; 291:1999-2006.

15. Broe KE, Chen TC, Weinberg J, Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Holick MF, Kiel DP. A higher dose of vitamin D reduces the risk of falls in nursing home residents: a randomized, multiple-dose study. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2007; 55:234-9.

16. Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Orav EJ, Dawson-Hughes B. Effect of cholecalciferol plus calcium on falling in ambulatory older men and women: a 3-year randomized controlled trial. Arch Intern Med. 2006; 166:424-30.

17. Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Dawson-Hughes B, Staehelin HB, et al. Fall prevention with supplemental and active forms of vitamin D: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. BMJ. 2009; 339:b3692.

18. Sanders KM, Stuart AL, Williamson EJ; et al. Annual high-dose oral vitamin D and falls and fractures in older women: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 2010;303:1815-1822.

19. Giovannucci E. Expanding roles of vitamin D. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009; 94:418-20.

20. Giovannucci E, Liu Y, Hollis BW, Rimm EB. 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of myocardial infarction in men: a prospective study. Arch Intern Med. 2008; 168:1174-80.

21. Pilz S, Marz W, Wellnitz B, et al. Association of vitamin D deficiency with heart failure and sudden cardiac death in a large cross-sectional study of patients referred for coronary angiography. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008; 93:3927-35.

22. Pilz S, Dobnig H, Fischer JE, et al. Low vitamin D levels predict stroke in patients referred to coronary angiography. Stroke. 2008; 39:2611-3.

23. Wang TJ, Pencina MJ, Booth SL, et al. Vitamin D deficiency and risk of cardiovascular disease. Circulation. 2008; 117:503-11.

24. Dobnig H, Pilz S, Scharnagl H, et al. Independent association of low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Arch Intern Med. 2008; 168:1340-9.

25. Holick MF. The vitamin D deficiency pandemic and consequences for nonskeletal health: mechanisms of action. Mol Aspects Med. 2008; 29:361-8.

26. Garland CF, Garland FC. Do sunlight and vitamin D reduce the likelihood of colon cancer? Int J Epidemiol. 1980; 9:227-31.

27. Garland CF, Gorham ED, Mohr SB, Garland FC. Vitamin D for cancer prevention: global perspective. Ann Epidemiol. 2009; 19:468-83.

28. Yin L, Grandi N, Raum E, Haug U, Arndt V, Brenner H. Meta-analysis: longitudinal studies of serum vitamin D and colorectal cancer risk. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2009; 30:113-25.

29. Wu K, Feskanich D, Fuchs CS, Willett WC, Hollis BW, Giovannucci EL. A nested case control study of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and risk of colorectal cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007; 99:1120-9.

30. Gorham ED, Garland CF, Garland FC, et al. Optimal vitamin D status for colorectal cancer prevention: a quantitative meta analysis. Am J Prev Med. 2007; 32:210-6.

31. Giovannucci E. Epidemiological evidence for vitamin D and colorectal cancer. J Bone Miner Res. 2007; 22 Suppl 2:V81-5.

32. Lin J, Zhang SM, Cook NR, Manson JE, Lee IM, Buring JE. Intakes of calcium and vitamin D and risk of colorectal cancer in women. Am J Epidemiol. 2005; 161:755-64.

33. Huncharek M, Muscat J, Kupelnick B. Colorectal cancer risk and dietary intake of calcium, vitamin D, and dairy products: a meta-analysis of 26,335 cases from 60 observational studies. Nutr Cancer. 2009; 61:47-69.

34. Bertone-Johnson ER, Chen WY, Holick MF, et al. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and risk of breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005; 14:1991-7.

35. Garland CF, Gorham ED, Mohr SB, et al. Vitamin D and prevention of breast cancer: pooled analysis. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007; 103:708-11.

36. Lin J, Manson JE, Lee IM, Cook NR, Buring JE, Zhang SM. Intakes of calcium and vitamin D and breast cancer risk in women. Arch Intern Med. 2007; 167:1050-9.

37. Robien K, Cutler GJ, Lazovich D. Vitamin D intake and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women: the Iowa Women’s Health Study. Cancer Causes Control. 2007; 18:775-82.

38. Freedman DM, Chang SC, Falk RT, et al. Serum levels of vitamin D metabolites and breast cancer risk in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008; 17:889-94.

39. Munger KL, Levin LI, Hollis BW, Howard NS, Ascherio A. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and risk of multiple sclerosis. JAMA. 2006; 296:2832-8.

40. Gillespie KM. Type 1 diabetes: pathogenesis and prevention. CMAJ. 2006; 175:165-70.

41. Hypponen E, Laara E, Reunanen A, Jarvelin MR, Virtanen SM. Intake of vitamin D and risk of type 1 diabetes: a birth-cohort study. Lancet. 2001; 358:1500-3.

42. Zipitis CS, Akobeng AK. Vitamin D supplementation in early childhood and risk of type 1 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Arch Dis Child. 2008; 93:512-7.

43. Hope-Simpson RE. The role of season in the epidemiology of influenza. J Hyg (Lond). 1981; 86:35-47.

44. Cannell JJ, Vieth R, Umhau JC, et al. Epidemic influenza and vitamin D. Epidemiol Infect. 2006; 134:1129-40.

45. Ginde AA, Mansbach JM, Camargo CA, Jr. Association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and upper respiratory tract infection in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Arch Intern Med. 2009; 169:384-90.

46. Urashima M, Segawa T, Okazaki M, Kurihara M, Wada Y, Ida H. Randomized trial of vitamin D supplementation to prevent seasonal influenza A in schoolchildren. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 91:1255-60. Epub 2010 Mar 10.

47. Zasloff M. Fighting infections with vitamin D. Nat Med. 2006; 12:388-90.

48. Nnoaham KE, Clarke A. Low serum vitamin D levels and tuberculosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Int J Epidemiol. 2008; 37:113-9.

49. Chocano-Bedoya P, Ronnenberg AG. Vitamin D and tuberculosis. Nutr Rev. 2009; 67:289-93.

50. Autier P, Gandini S. Vitamin D supplementation and total mortality: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Arch Intern Med. 2007; 167:1730-7.

51. Giovannucci E. Can vitamin D reduce total mortality? Arch Intern Med. 2007; 167:1709-10.

52. Dawson-Hughes B, Mithal A, Bonjour JP,  et al. IOF position statement: vitamin D recommendations for older adults. Osteoporos Int. 2010. 21:1151-4.

53. Canadian Cancer Society.  Canadian Cancer Society Announces Vitamin D Recommendation. 2007. Accessed March 24, 2011.

54. National Academies. Press Release: IOM Report Sets New Dietary Intake Levels for Calcium and Vitamin D To Maintain Health and Avoid Risks Associated With Excess. November 30, 2010. Accessed March 24, 2011.

Fonte

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/vitamin-d/#vitamin-d-recommendations

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/vitamin-d/

Informacion is beautiful – Vitamin D

Informacion is beautiful

http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/2010/vitamin-d/

Vitamin D

November 26, 2010

http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/ Informacion is beautiful

http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/2010/vitamin-d/

Vitamin D

November 26, 2010

http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/

————-

Luz solar e vitamina D para a saúde óssea e prevenção de doenças auto-imunes, cânceres e doenças cardiovasculares.

Vitamina D – Sem Censura – Dr. Cicero Galli Coimbra e Daniel Cunha

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIwIWim4hNM&list=UU5grjCGNi25VAR8J0eVuxVQ&index=4&feature=plcp

 

Luz solar e vitamina D para a saúde óssea e prevenção de doenças auto-imunes, cânceres e doenças cardiovasculares.

 

 

Sunlight and vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease.

 

Holick MF.

 

SourceDepartment of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, Nutrition, and Diabetes, Vitamin D, Skin, and Bone Research Laboratory, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA 02118, USA. mfholick@bu.edu= 

Abstract

 PMID:15585788[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15585788

 

 

Luz solar e vitamina D para a saúde óssea e prevenção de doenças auto-imunes, cânceres e doenças cardiovasculares.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dez; 80 (6 Supl): 1678S-88s.

Holick MF.

SourceDepartment de Medicina, Secção de Endocrinologia, Nutrição e Diabetes, vitamina D, pele e osso Research Laboratory, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA 02118, EUA. mfholick@bu.edu

A maioria dos seres humanos depende da exposição ao sol para satisfazer suas necessidades de vitamina D. Os fótons solares ultravioletas B são absorvidas pelo 7-dehidrocolesterol na pele, levando a sua transformação em pré-vitamina D3, que é rapidamente convertido em vitamina D3.

Temporada, latitude, hora do dia, a pigmentação da pele, envelhecimento, uso de filtro solar e vidro correspondem a toda a influência na produção cutânea de vitamina D3.

Uma vez formada, a vitamina D3 é metabolizada no fígado em 25-hidroxivitamina D3 e, em seguida, no rim em sua forma biologicamente activa, 1,25-dihidroxivitamina D3.

A deficiência de vitamina D é uma epidemia não reconhecida entre crianças e adultos nos Estados Unidos, embora exista. A deficiência de vitamina D não só provoca o raquitismo nas crianças, mas também precipita e agrava a osteoporose em adultos e provoca a osteomalácia dolorosa, uma doença óssea.

A deficiência de vitamina D tem sido associada com o aumento dos riscos de cancro mortais, doença cardiovascular, esclerose múltipla, artrite reumatóide, e diabetes mellitus tipo 1. Manter as concentrações sanguíneas de 25-hidroxivitamina D acima de 80 nmol / L (aproximadamente 30 ng / mL), não só é importante para maximizar a absorção de cálcio intestinal, mas também pode ser importante para fornecer o extrarenal 1alfa-hidroxilase, que está presente na maioria dos tecidos para produzir 1 ,25-dihidroxivitamina D3.

Embora a exposição excessiva crônica ao sol aumente o risco de câncer de pele melanoma, evitar toda a exposição directa ao sol aumenta o risco de deficiência de vitamina D, que pode ter consequências graves.

Monitorização das concentrações séricas de 25-hidroxivitamina D anual deve ajudar a revelar deficiências de vitamina D. Exposição apreciável do sol (geralmente 5-10 minutos de exposição dos braços e pernas ou as mãos, braços e face, 2 ou 3 vezes por semana) e aumento da ingestão de vitamina D na dieta e suplementação são abordagens razoáveis para garantir a suficiência de vitamina D e prevenir doenças.

PMID: 15585788 [PubMed – indexado para o MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15585788

Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dez; 80 (6 Supl): 1678S-88s.
Luz solar e vitamina D para a saúde óssea e prevenção de doenças auto-imunes, cânceres e doenças cardiovasculares.

 

Holick MF.

SourceDepartment de Medicina, Secção de Endocrinologia, Nutrição e Diabetes, vitamina D, pele e osso Research Laboratory, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA 02118, EUA. mfholick@bu.edu

PMID: 15585788 [PubMed – indexado para o MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15585788 

 

—-

SUNLIGHT AND VITAMIN D FOR BONE HEALTH AND PREVENTION OF AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES, CANCERS, AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE.

 

Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec;80(6 Suppl):1678S-88S.

 Holick MF. 

SourceDepartment of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, Nutrition, and Diabetes, Vitamin D, Skin, and Bone Research Laboratory, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA 02118, USA. mfholick@bu.edu

 

Abstract

 

 

Most humans depend on sun exposure to satisfy their requirements for vitamin D. Solar ultraviolet B photons are absorbed by 7-dehydrocholesterol in the skin, leading to its transformation to previtamin D3, which is rapidly converted to vitamin D3. Season, latitude, time of day, skin pigmentation, aging, sunscreen use, and glass all influence the cutaneous production of vitamin D3.  

Once formed, vitamin D3 is metabolized in the liver to 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and then in the kidney to its biologically active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Vitamin D deficiency is an unrecognized epidemic among both children and adults in the United States.

 Vitamin D deficiency not only causes rickets among children but also precipitates and exacerbates osteoporosis among adults and causes the painful bone disease osteomalacia. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with increased risks of deadly cancers, cardiovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and type 1 diabetes mellitus.

 Maintaining blood concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D above 80 nmol/L (approximately 30 ng/mL) not only is important for maximizing intestinal calcium absorption but also may be important for providing the extrarenal 1alpha-hydroxylase that is present in most tissues to produce 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

 

 

Although chronic excessive exposure to sunlight increases the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer, the avoidance of all direct sun exposure increases the risk of vitamin D deficiency, which can have serious consequences. Monitoring serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations yearly should help reveal vitamin D deficiencies.

 Sensible sun exposure (usually 5-10 min of exposure of the arms and legs or the hands, arms, and face, 2 or 3 times per week) and increased dietary and supplemental vitamin D intakes are reasonable approaches to guarantee vitamin D sufficiency.

 

 

PMID:15585788[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15585788

 

Informações médicas sobre a importancia da Vitamina D. No Brasil e no mundo, dados atuais.

Informações médicas sobre a importancia da Vitamina D. No Brasil e no mundo, dados atuais.

Folha de São Paulo: Terapia polêmica usa vitamina D em doses altas contra esclerose múltipla

28/05/2012 — Celso Galli Coimbra

Ediçao de Domingo – 27/05/2012

__

O vídeo referido na reportagem dominical da Folha está no endereço:

Vitamina D – Por uma outra terapia (Vitamin D – For an alternative therapy)

__

Ele passou a tomar todo dia uma dose alta de vitamina D, prescrita pelo neurologista Cícero Galli Coimbra, da Unifesp (Universidade Federal de São Paulo). O tratamento não é reconhecido pela maioria dos especialistas, que o consideram experimental.

 

Isso não impediu Cunha de usar a vitamina. Ele ficou tão satisfeito que realizou, com meios próprios e ajuda de amigos, um documentário de 30 minutos, disponível desde abril no YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erAgu1XcY-U), sobre a terapia.

 

No vídeo, com 18 mil acessos, pacientes de Coimbra falam sobre a vida antes e depois do novo tratamento, e o médico explica a relação entre a vitamina D e a doença.

 

                     Daniel Cunha, 26, autor de documentário sobre esclerose                    

 

HORMÔNIO

Produzida pelo corpo quando a pele fica exposta ao sol, a vitamina D na verdade é um hormônio, apesar de manter o nome consagrado.

 

É consenso há muito tempo que ela tem papel importante na mineralização dos ossos. “Experimentos vêm mostrando que ele age em vários outros tecidos, especialmente no sistema imunológico”, afirma a endocrinologista Marise Castro.

 

No caso da esclerose múltipla, pesquisas mostram que a prevalência da doença é mais alta em países distantes da linha do Equador, com incidência solar mais baixa, onde a população produz menos vitamina D.

 

Segundo Coimbra, a suplementação com o hormônio vem sendo testada desde os anos 1980 para reduzir os surtos de esclerose, períodos em que a doença pode deixar sequelas. Para ele, já há evidência suficiente de que as pessoas com a moléstia têm deficiência da vitamina.

 

“Desde 2003 venho cumprindo o dever ético de corrigir o problema metabólico desses pacientes. Todo médico tem a obrigação de fazer isso”, afirma o neurologista.

 

Até hoje, diz Coimbra, quase 900 pacientes com esclerose múltipla foram tratados. A maioria usa de 30 mil a 70 mil UI de vitamina D ao dia, mas alguns tomam 200 mil.

 

A dose ideal para a suplementação ainda é motivo de debate. Segundo Marise Castro, a quantidade usual é de 400 a 2.000 UI.

 

Mas, segundo Coimbra, essas doses não são realistas. “As pessoas com esclerose têm uma resistência genética à vitamina e precisam de doses mais altas.”

Os pacientes dele seguem uma dieta sem laticínios e fazem exames periódicos para controlar os níveis de cálcio na urina e no sangue. A vitamina D tem relação com o cálcio, e as doses altas podem causar cálculos renais.

“A intoxicação por vitamina D pode ser grave e leva meses para curar, porque ela se deposita no tecido adiposo”, diz a endocrinologista.

Coimbra rebate, citando um estudo que acompanhou pacientes com esclerose tomando vitamina D por sete meses, em doses crescentes, até chegar a 40 mil UI por dia.

Editoria de Arte/Folhapress

 

Para Maria Fernanda Mendes, membro-titular da Academia Brasileira de Neurologia, não há provas suficientes para receitar a terapia.

 

“Temos feito exames para dosar a vitamina e repô-la em caso de deficiência, até por conta da demanda dos pacientes, mas não é a recomendação oficial. Como há um tratamento comprovadamente melhor, esse só pode ser usado em pesquisas.”

 

Coimbra diz que não concorda com a realização de estudos controlados em que parte dos pacientes recebam a vitamina e parte, placebo.

 

“Alguém já fez estudo controlado sobre usar insulina para crianças diabéticas? Não, porque elas iam morrer. Se você tivesse uma filha com esclerose múltipla, que poderia ficar cega em um surto, correria o risco do placebo?”

 

Coimbra afirma que a relutância dos médicos em aceitar o tratamento vem dos conflitos de interesse com as farmacêuticas. “Há um interesse fabuloso no tratamento tradicional, que custa até R$ 11 mil por paciente por mês.”

 

O conflito de interesses foi um dos motivos que levou Daniel Cunha a fazer o documentário. “O tratamento com vitamina D me custa R$ 50 por mês. É a minha saúde, não é um leilão. Não me interessa se alguém vai ganhar dinheiro com isso. As pesquisas que todo mundo pede nunca vão sair, quem pagaria isso se não as farmacêuticas? Mas as pessoas não precisam ser reféns. A internet é nossa arma.”

 

 

 

Fonte: http://www1.folha.uol.com.br/equilibrioesaude/1096497-terapia-polemica-usa-vitamina-d-em-doses-altas-contra-esclerose-multipla.shtml

 

Vídeos e textos sobre o assunto:

1.

Vitamina D pode revolucionar o tratamento da esclerose múltipla

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2010/08/03/vitamina-d-pode-revolucionar-o-tratamento-da-esclerose-multipla/

 

2.

Vitamina D pode combater males que mais matam pessoas no mundo

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2010/03/20/vitamina-d-pode-combater-males-que-mais-matam-pessoas-no-mundo/

 

3.

 Informações médicas sobre a prevenção e tratamento de doenças neurodegenerativas e autoimunes, como Parkinson, Alzheimer, Lupus, Psoríase, Vitiligo, depressão

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2011/03/23/informacoes-medicas-sobre-a-prevencao-e-tratamento-de-doencas-neurodegenerativas-e-auto-imunes-como-parkinson-alzheimer-lupus-psoriase-vitiligo-depressao/

 

4.                                       

 Vitamina D – Por uma outra terapia

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/vitamina-d-por-uma-outra-terapia/  

__ 

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2012/05/28/folha-de-sao-paulo-terapia-polemica-usa-vitamina-d-em-doses-altas-contra-esclerose-multipla/

Nos países eslavos, a população movimenta-se para que o governo forneça as vitaminas, especialmente a D. Nos EUA, os cientistas requerem ao governo – ver a Times -,  a suplementação de vitamina D para assegurar a população do desenvolvimento de varias doenças, alem da esclerose múltipla, o cancro, as diabetes e outras doenças autoimunitarias. Custa mais caro, em termos de desperdício em recursos financeiros e humanos, deixar uma nação com altos índices de pessoas doentes, do que investir na Medicina Preventiva e oferecer uma dieta verdadeiramente saudável.

 

Baixos índices de vitamina D no sangue estão diretamente associados ao estresse emocional ou sofrimento. Em casos de doenças auto-imunitárias, tais como a esclerose múltipla, artrite reumatoide, psoriase, hipertireoidismo, hipotireoidismo, lupus, vitiligo, por exemplo, existe deficiência de vitamina D confirmada em exames de sangue.

 

O que é possível dizer em breves palavras, já oferece um quadro preocupante. A insuficiência de vitamina D tem desenvolvido muitas doenças que já são aceitas como “comuns” e, no entanto, todas graves. Os médicos vêm apresentando pesquisa que aponta o aumento de epidemias em todo planeta, por causa da falta de investimento dos governos em saúde preventiva com suplementação da vitamina D.             

 

O aumento da Deficiência de vitamina D geralmente apresenta deformidade óssea (raquitismo) ou hipocalcemia na infância, e com dor músculo-esquelética e fraqueza em adultos.

 

Muitos outros problemas de saúde, incluindo doenças cardiovasculares, diabetes tipo 2, vários tipos de câncer, e auto-imunes condições foram recentemente associados com insuficiência de vitamina D.

 

O status da vitamina D é mais confiável determinada pelo ensaio de soro de 25-hidroxivitamina D (25-OHD).

 

O espectro dessas doenças comuns é particularmente preocupante porque os estudos observacionais têm demonstrado que a insuficiência de vitamina D, Raquitismo em crianças e osteomalacia em adultos são as manifestações clássicas de deficiência de vitamina D profunda.  Nos últimos anos, no entanto, aparecem doenças não músculo-esqueléticas condições incluindo câncer, síndrome metabólica, infecciosas e doenças autoimunes, esclerose múltipla também foram encontrados associados com baixos níveis de vitamina D. O Aumento da prevalência de distúrbios ligados à deficiência de vitamina D, é refletida no aumento do numero de crianças doentes.

 

Epidemias crescem se não for dada nutrição adequada e suplementos á toda população. Este é o cuidado que o governo brasileiro deve ter com todas as pessoas, indistintamente, em todas as idades.

 

Dilma e Lula não sabem disso, e desde 2008 favorecem pesquisas com células de embriões e abortos [ver Fim do Estado de direito, PNDH3]. O PNDH-3 PREVE A LIBERAÇÃO DE CRIMES, fim do Estado de Direito

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/23/o-pndh-3-preve-a-liberacao-de-crimes-fim-do-estado-de-direito/

 

Vitamina D

 

Essas doenças graves sequer teriam desenvolvido nas pessoas, se existisse o cuidado com a medicina preventiva com a suplementação da vitamina D.

 

“A principal razão pela qual a medicina atual desdenha estes importantes conhecimentos médicos já antigos e com ampla fundamentação na história recente da medicina e confirmados em vários países, através de diversas publicações, é simplesmente porque ela está subordinada aos interesses extremamente gananciosos da indústria farmacêutica internacional”

 

o          “Comentário: a principal razão pela qual a medicina atual desdenha estes importantes conhecimentos médicos já antigos e com ampla fundamentação na história recente da medicina e confirmados em vários países, através de diversas publicações”

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRQkITHjZ5k&feature=player_embedded#

 

o          Informações médicas sobre a prevenção e tratamento de doenças neurodegenerativas e autoimunes, como Parkinson, Alzheimer, Lupus, Psoríase, Vitiligo, depressão, tireoidite, esclerose multipla

 

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/category/doencas-autoimunes/

—-

 

Melhor prevenir do que remediar. Prevençao e Cura de doenças neurodegenerativas e autoimunitarias é real.

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2012/02/06/melhor-prevenir-do-que-remediar-prevencao-e-cura-de-doencas-neurodegenerativas-e-autoimunitarias-e-real/

 

Prevençao e Cura de doenças neurodegenerativas e autoimunitarias, é cuidado de baixo custo. Trata-se da medicina preventiva. Este é o tratamento que os brasileiros precisam na saúde publica. 

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/07/04/prevencao-e-cura-de-doencas-neurodegenerativas-e-autoimunitarias/

 —

 Brasil é lanterna em investimento na saúde

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/05/brasil-e-lanterna-em-investimento-na-saude/

Importancia da vitamina D e do metabolismo        

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2012/02/29/importancia-da-vitamina-d-e-do-metabolismo/

Os médicos vêm apresentando pesquisa que aponta o aumento de epidemias em todo planeta, por causa da falta de investimento dos governos em saúde preventiva com suplementação da vitamina D.

 

Vitamin D deficiency: a global perspective https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/vitamin-d-deficiency-a-global-perspective/

 

Deficiência de vitamina D: uma epidemia global

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/deficiencia-de-vitamina-d-uma-epidemia-global/

 

Symposium: Vitamin D Insufficiency: A Significant Risk Factor in Chronic Diseases and Potential Disease-Specific Biomarkers of Vitamin D Sufficiency Vitamin D Intake: A Global Perspective of Current Status

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/symposium-vitamin-d-insufficiency-a-significant-risk-factor-in-chronic-diseases-and-potential-disease-specific-biomarkers-of-vitamin-d-sufficiency-vitamin-d-intake-a-global-perspective-of-current-s/

 

 

A Cura e prevenção ocorrem por terapia natural. Suplementação de vitaminas, dieta alimentar

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2012/02/18/a-cura-e-prevencao-ocorrem-por-terapia-natural-suplementacao-de-vitaminas-dieta-alimentar/

As células-tronco de embriões nunca foram necessárias para “curar”. Esta foi a grande mentira milionária de uma Medicina meramente comercial, industria farmaceutica e laboratórios multinacionais e clínicas – inclusive abortistas. Os tecidos de fetos ou embrioes são usados em várias indústrias, desde as cosméticas, passando pelas de plásticas, até de medicamentos inuteis. 

 

Brasil ainda investe pouco em saúde País investe apenas 8,7% do valor arrecadado com impostos em saúde. Número é inferior ao de países como Argentina, Chile e Venezuela Um estudo realizado pela Fundação Instituto de Administração da Universidade de São Paulo (USP)

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/05/brasil-ainda-investe-pouco-em-saude

 

Brasil é lanterna em investimento na saúde

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/05/brasil-e-lanterna-em-investimento-na-saude/

Comunicação Portal Social        

 

Em investimentos na saúde pública, o Brasil está mais perto de Angola do que da Suíça. Divulgado ano passado, relatório da Organização Mundial de Saúde (OMS) aponta que o Estado brasileiro aplicou apenas 5,4% dos seus recursos no setor, ocupando uma vergonhosa 169ª posição entre 198 nações. Perdeu feio para a Argentina, que está em 54º lugar.

 

Isso indica que o SUS não é o gigante que se imagina. Há mais dados confirmando esse raquitismo. A pesquisadora Maria Alicia Domínguez Ugá, da Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública da Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, constata que a participação pública nos gastos com o sistema brasileiro de saúde é só de 44%. Os outros 66% são pagos pelas famílias ou cobertos por planos privados.

Analisando desde 2005 a estrutura de financiamento da saúde dos brasileiros, Maria Alicia diz que, em termos de financiamento, o Brasil está distante de países onde o acesso à saúde é universal e integral. No Reino Unido, 86% são de recursos públicos. Na Suécia, a fatia é de 85%. O sistema brasileiro equipara-se, no que se refere à participação estatal, ao dos Estados Unidos. Para Maria Alicia, esse é o modelo liberal, em que predomina o gasto privado.

 

“É muito baixa a participação do sistema público no gasto em saúde no Brasil”.

Quando realizou a pesquisa, em 2005, em colaboração com Isabela Soares Santos, Maria Alicia calculou que o gasto total em saúde representava pouco mais de 8% do PIB do Brasil. Isso não é pouco. No entanto, o gasto público era de apenas 3,9%.

Vitamina D ajuda a prevenir diabetes, câncer, hipertensão e infecções

Vitamina D ajuda a prevenir diabetes, câncer, hipertensão e infecções

05/11/2009 – 13h24

Publicidade

FERNANDA BASSETTE
JULLIANE SILVEIRA
da Folha de S.Paulo

Não passa uma semana sem que surja uma nova pesquisa associando a falta de vitamina D no organismo a alguma doença. Os problemas vão além da saúde óssea prejudicada –relação já estabelecida, pois o nutriente contribui para a fixação do cálcio nos ossos. Hoje, estudos mostram que a deficiência pode levar a hipertensão, diabetes, infecções e alguns tipos de câncer.

Há até pouco tempo, os especialistas acreditavam que a discussão sobre a falta da vitamina era desnecessária no Brasil, já que um país tropical recebe luz solar suficiente –a maior parte da vitamina D é sintetizada com a ajuda dos raios solares.

No entanto, pesquisas recentes já apontam problemas entre os brasileiros. Um estudo realizado com 603 funcionários do Hospital Universitário da USP (Universidade de São Paulo) mostrou deficiências da vitamina tanto no fim do inverno quanto no término do verão.

Leonardo Wen/Folha Imagem

A empresária Vera Folli, 53, trocou os remédios contra esclerose múltipla por vitamina D e não manifesta nenhum sintoma da doença

“Ninguém esperava esses resultados para São Paulo. Ainda faltam estudos em outras partes do país, mas talvez seja possível extrapolar os resultados para toda a região que vai de Belo Horizonte ao Sul, principalmente nas grandes cidades”, diz Rosa Moysés, nefrologista do Hospital das Clínicas de São Paulo e autora da pesquisa.

Um outro trabalho, feito por pesquisadores da Unifesp (Universidade Federal de São Paulo), com 177 idosos que vivem em instituições e outros 243 idosos que moram em casa. Entre os primeiros, 41% tinham níveis muito baixos de vitamina D e, entre os outros, 30%.

“Os números são assustadores. Mesmo trabalhos com mulheres no Recife encontraram grande deficiência, porque elas também se escondem do sol. É um problema das grandes cidades”, afirma a endocrinologista Marise Castro, chefe do Setor de Doenças Osteometabólicas da universidade.

O deficit também existe entre adolescentes. A nutricionista Bárbara Peters, pesquisadora da Unifesp, detectou o problema em uma pesquisa feita com 136 jovens de Indaiatuba (interior de São Paulo) –62% deles apresentavam índice insuficiente de vitamina D.

“Não esperava esse resultado, pois são adolescentes saudáveis que vivem em uma cidade bastante ensolarada.”

Trabalhos feitos em animais mostraram que a vitamina D tem um papel inibidor da renina, hormônio que contribui para elevar a pressão arterial.

Um trabalho finlandês divulgado na semana passada no “American Journal of Epidemiology” confirma o alerta. Por 27 anos, foram monitoradas 5.000 pessoas.

Houve relação entre baixos índices da vitamina e maior risco de derrame e de outras doenças cardiovasculares.

“Pessoas com níveis adequados de vitamina D têm menos risco de calcificação das artérias, pois a vitamina possui uma ação anti-inflamatória”, afirma Marcelo de Medeiros Pinheiro, reumatologista da Unifesp.

Leonardo Wen/Folha Imagem

A aposentada Suely Pedroso Riskala, 58, toma vitamina D há mais de dez anos; ela não se expunha ao sol diariamente

O nutriente também estimula a produção de insulina, melhorando o controle da glicose, e diminui a resistência ao hormônio –o que ocorre em quem tem diabetes tipo 2. Sua falta pode favorecer o desenvolvimento da doença.

Tumores de cólon, de próstata e de mama também já foram associados à deficiência de vitamina D em pesquisas. A explicação pode estar no papel da vitamina no ciclo de proliferação celular -a substância ajuda a equilibrar a divisão das células.

Quem tem deficiência da vitamina é também mais vulnerável a infecções, pois o nutriente atua na produção de proteínas antibacterianas.

“Uma das mais estudadas é a tuberculose. Um estudo em laboratório mostrou o papel da vitamina D na doença”, acrescenta Moysés.

Combate

A explicação para as baixas taxas da vitamina no sangue são a pouca exposição ao sol –já que as pessoas passam boa parte do tempo em escritórios– e o baixo consumo de alimentos com o nutriente em quantidade razoável.

Com relação ao sol, ainda existe uma grande polêmica: o uso de filtro solar. Para alguns especialistas, o protetor dificulta a absorção dos raios UVB, responsáveis por atuar na sintetização da vitamina.

Por isso, eles sugerem uma exposição de pernas e braços descobertos por cerca de 15 minutos diários sem filtro.

“O produto certamente diminui a produção da vitamina D. Mas hábitos saudáveis [como exercícios ao ar livre] também podem ajudar a diminuir a hipovitaminose D, pois aumentam a exposição solar, mesmo naqueles que irão usar o protetor”, diz Moysés.

No entanto, Marcus Maia, dermatologista e oncologista da Santa Casa de São Paulo, discorda e diz que não existe fotoproteção tão intensa capaz de impedir a síntese da vitamina.

Rafael Hupsel/Folha Imagem

Vera Magalhães, 80, teve deficiência de vitamina diagnosticada devido à osteoporose

Ele diz que sete minutos de exposição solar, três vezes por semana, são o suficiente. Maia analisou os níveis de vitamina D no sangue de 50 pessoas: 25 com melanoma (tipo mais agressivo de câncer de pele) e que usavam protetor solar diariamente nas doses recomendadas e 25 pessoas que não tinham a doença.

Ele constatou que nenhum paciente tinha níveis insuficientes da vitamina. “Nem quem precisa usa o filtro solar corretamente. Proteção solar absoluta, capaz de bloquear a síntese da vitamina D, é impossível. Por isso, outras possíveis causas do deficit da vitamina teriam de ser estudadas”, diz.

O consumo de alimentos que contêm o nutriente é indicado, mas não resolve o problema. Só de 10% a 20% do valor diário recomendado podem ser obtido por meio dos alimentos.

Segundo Marcelo Pinheiro, pesquisa feita com 2.400 pessoas constatou que o brasileiro consome cinco vezes menos vitamina D do que o recomendado internacionalmente -que é de dez a 15 microgramas.

Por esse motivos, especialistas acreditam que seja necessária uma política de fortificação de alimentos e de suplementos da vitamina. No Brasil, o nutriente só é encontrado em versão manipulada.

Roseli Sarni, presidente do Departamento de Nutrição da Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria, diz que crianças de até 18 meses devem receber suplementação, pois o que ingerem com o leite materno não é suficiente.

Sarni afirma que a suplementação de vitamina independe do fato de a criança tomar sol. Nessa faixa etária, a recomendação semanal é de meia hora se o bebê estiver só de fraldas ou de duas horas se estiver com rosto, mãos e pés expostos ao sol.

Colaborou CLÁUDIA COLLUCCI

*

Alimentos com mais vitamina D
É indicada a ingestão de 10 a 15 microgramas por dia, além da exposição ao sol

Salmão
100 g = 7 microgramas

Sardinha
100 g = 4,5 microgramas

Atum
100 g = 3,5 microgramas

Gema de ovo
1 unidade = 0,9 micrograma

Ostra
100 g = 8 microgramas

Leite integral
1 copo (250 ml) = 0,5 micrograma

Leite de soja fortificado
1 copo (250 ml) = 2,5 microgramas

Fonte: BÁRBARA SANTA ROSA EMO PETERS, nutricionista, e MARCELO PINHEIRO, reumatologista

*

Sintetizando
A maior parte da vitamina D presente no organismo é produzida coma ajuda do sol

1 – Uma substância chamada 7-dehidrocolesterol está presente na epiderme

2 – Os raios UVB do sol entram em contato com a pele e o calor converte a substância em vitamina D3

3 – A vitamina D3 cai na corrente sanguínea e chega ao fígado

4 – No órgão, se transformaem 25-hidroxivitaminas D

5 – Nos rins, se transformam em vitamina D ativa

6 – Então, participa de processos como fixação de cálcio no osso, absorção de cálcio pelo intestino e funções neuromusculares

Fonte: MARISE CASTRO, endocrinologista

http://www1.folha.uol.com.br/folha/equilibrio/noticias/ult263u648076.shtml

—–

Folha de São Paulo: Terapia polêmica usa vitamina D em doses altas contra esclerose múltipla

Folha de São Paulo: Terapia polêmica usa vitamina D em doses altas contra esclerose múltipla

 

28/05/2012 — Celso Galli Coimbra

Ediçao de Domingo – 27/05/2012

__

O vídeo referido na reportagem dominical da Folha está no endereço:

Vitamina D – Por uma outra terapia (Vitamin D – For an alternative therapy)

__

DÉBORA MISMETTI
EDITORA-ASSISTENTE DE “CIÊNCIA+SAÚDE”

Há quase três anos o paulistano Daniel Cunha, 26, acordou com metade de seu rosto dormente. Foi trabalhar, voltou para casa e achou que a sensação ia passar. Não só não passou como piorou.

Foi ao hospital, fez exames e, depois de algumas consultas, recebeu o diagnóstico de esclerose múltipla. O mal é autoimune, causado pelo ataque ao revestimento dos neurônios pelo sistema imunológico da própria pessoa.

Desde 2010, Cunha abandonou o tratamento convencional, com injeções de interferon, remédio que controla a ação inflamatória da esclerose, mas causa efeitos colaterais como febre e mal-estar.

Ele passou a tomar todo dia uma dose alta de vitamina D, prescrita pelo neurologista Cícero Galli Coimbra, da Unifesp (Universidade Federal de São Paulo). O tratamento não é reconhecido pela maioria dos especialistas, que o consideram experimental.

Isso não impediu Cunha de usar a vitamina. Ele ficou tão satisfeito que realizou, com meios próprios e ajuda de amigos, um documentário de 30 minutos, disponível desde abril no YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erAgu1XcY-U), sobre a terapia.

No vídeo, com 18 mil acessos, pacientes de Coimbra falam sobre a vida antes e depois do novo tratamento, e o médico explica a relação entre a vitamina D e a doença.

 

                     Daniel Cunha, 26, autor de documentário sobre esclerose                    

 

HORMÔNIO

Produzida pelo corpo quando a pele fica exposta ao sol, a vitamina D na verdade é um hormônio, apesar de manter o nome consagrado.

É consenso há muito tempo que ela tem papel importante na mineralização dos ossos. “Experimentos vêm mostrando que ele age em vários outros tecidos, especialmente no sistema imunológico”, afirma a endocrinologista Marise Castro.

No caso da esclerose múltipla, pesquisas mostram que a prevalência da doença é mais alta em países distantes da linha do Equador, com incidência solar mais baixa, onde a população produz menos vitamina D.

Segundo Coimbra, a suplementação com o hormônio vem sendo testada desde os anos 1980 para reduzir os surtos de esclerose, períodos em que a doença pode deixar sequelas. Para ele, já há evidência suficiente de que as pessoas com a moléstia têm deficiência da vitamina.

“Desde 2003 venho cumprindo o dever ético de corrigir o problema metabólico desses pacientes. Todo médico tem a obrigação de fazer isso”, afirma o neurologista.

Até hoje, diz Coimbra, quase 900 pacientes com esclerose múltipla foram tratados. A maioria usa de 30 mil a 70 mil UI de vitamina D ao dia, mas alguns tomam 200 mil.

A dose ideal para a suplementação ainda é motivo de debate. Segundo Marise Castro, a quantidade usual é de 400 a 2.000 UI.

Mas, segundo Coimbra, essas doses não são realistas. “As pessoas com esclerose têm uma resistência genética à vitamina e precisam de doses mais altas.”

Os pacientes dele seguem uma dieta sem laticínios e fazem exames periódicos para controlar os níveis de cálcio na urina e no sangue. A vitamina D tem relação com o cálcio, e as doses altas podem causar cálculos renais.

“A intoxicação por vitamina D pode ser grave e leva meses para curar, porque ela se deposita no tecido adiposo”, diz a endocrinologista.

Coimbra rebate, citando um estudo que acompanhou pacientes com esclerose tomando vitamina D por sete meses, em doses crescentes, até chegar a 40 mil UI por dia.

Editoria de Arte/Folhapress

 

Para Maria Fernanda Mendes, membro-titular da Academia Brasileira de Neurologia, não há provas suficientes para receitar a terapia.

“Temos feito exames para dosar a vitamina e repô-la em caso de deficiência, até por conta da demanda dos pacientes, mas não é a recomendação oficial. Como há um tratamento comprovadamente melhor, esse só pode ser usado em pesquisas.”

Coimbra diz que não concorda com a realização de estudos controlados em que parte dos pacientes recebam a vitamina e parte, placebo.

“Alguém já fez estudo controlado sobre usar insulina para crianças diabéticas? Não, porque elas iam morrer. Se você tivesse uma filha com esclerose múltipla, que poderia ficar cega em um surto, correria o risco do placebo?”

Coimbra afirma que a relutância dos médicos em aceitar o tratamento vem dos conflitos de interesse com as farmacêuticas. “Há um interesse fabuloso no tratamento tradicional, que custa até R$ 11 mil por paciente por mês.”

O conflito de interesses foi um dos motivos que levou Daniel Cunha a fazer o documentário. “O tratamento com vitamina D me custa R$ 50 por mês. É a minha saúde, não é um leilão. Não me interessa se alguém vai ganhar dinheiro com isso. As pesquisas que todo mundo pede nunca vão sair, quem pagaria isso se não as farmacêuticas? Mas as pessoas não precisam ser reféns. A internet é nossa arma.”

Editoria de Arte/Folhapress

 

Fonte: http://www1.folha.uol.com.br/equilibrioesaude/1096497-terapia-polemica-usa-vitamina-d-em-doses-altas-contra-esclerose-multipla.shtml

Vídeos e textos sobre o assunto:

1.

Vitamina D pode revolucionar o tratamento da esclerose múltipla

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2010/08/03/vitamina-d-pode-revolucionar-o-tratamento-da-esclerose-multipla/

 

2.

Vitamina D pode combater males que mais matam pessoas no mundo

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2010/03/20/vitamina-d-pode-combater-males-que-mais-matam-pessoas-no-mundo/

 

3.

 

Informações médicas sobre a prevenção e tratamento de doenças neurodegenerativas e autoimunes, como Parkinson, Alzheimer, Lupus, Psoríase, Vitiligo, depressão

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2011/03/23/informacoes-medicas-sobre-a-prevencao-e-tratamento-de-doencas-neurodegenerativas-e-auto-imunes-como-parkinson-alzheimer-lupus-psoriase-vitiligo-depressao/

 

4.                                       

 

Vitamina D – Por uma outra terapia

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/vitamina-d-por-uma-outra-terapia/  

__

-30.039254 -51.216930

 

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2012/05/28/folha-de-sao-paulo-terapia-polemica-usa-vitamina-d-em-doses-altas-contra-esclerose-multipla/

Health Benefits of Omega 3 fatty acids

 

Health Benefits of Omega 3 fatty acids

Os benefícios do ômega 3

 

Health Benefits of Omega 3 fatty acids

Written by Gloria Tsang, RD
Published in Jul 2005; Updated in Mar 2010

(HealthCastle.com) What are omega 3 fatty acids? They’re a nutritional element that first caught researchers’ attention about 20 years ago – and what they discovered could have health benefits for anyone worried about a healthy heart.

In the early 1980s, studies showed that the Inuit had low rates of heart disease despite their high-fat diet rich in fish. It turns out the omega 3 fatty acids in the fish may be what protects their hearts, along with other health benefits.

Benefits of Omega 3 Fatty Acids in Heart Disease and Cholesterol

Omega 3 fatty acids are poly-unsaturated fatty acids. Studies show that a diet rich in omega 3 fatty acids may help lower triglycerides and increase HDL cholesterol (the good cholesterol). Omega 3 fatty acids may also act as an anticoagulant to prevent blood from clotting. Several other studies also suggest that these fatty acids may help lower high blood pressure.

Potential Benefits of Omega 3 Fatty Acids in Alzheimer’s

Omega 3 fatty acids may protect against the accumulation in the body of a protein believed to be linked to Alzheimer’s disease, according to the results of a new animal study published in the March 2005 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. This study specifically investigated one particular kind of omega 3 fatty acids – Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and the results are encouraging.

Health Benefits of Omega 3 fatty acids

Written by Gloria Tsang, RD
Published in Jul 2005; Updated in Mar 2010

(HealthCastle.com) What are omega 3 fatty acids? They’re a nutritional element that first caught researchers’ attention about 20 years ago – and what they discovered could have health benefits for anyone worried about a healthy heart.

In the early 1980s, studies showed that the Inuit had low rates of heart disease despite their high-fat diet rich in fish. It turns out the omega 3 fatty acids in the fish may be what protects their hearts, along with other health benefits.

Benefits of Omega 3 Fatty Acids in Heart Disease and Cholesterol

Omega 3 fatty acids are poly-unsaturated fatty acids. Studies show that a diet rich in omega 3 fatty acids may help lower triglycerides and increase HDL cholesterol (the good cholesterol). Omega 3 fatty acids may also act as an anticoagulant to prevent blood from clotting. Several other studies also suggest that these fatty acids may help lower high blood pressure.

Potential Benefits of Omega 3 Fatty Acids in Alzheimer’s

Omega 3 fatty acids may protect against the accumulation in the body of a protein believed to be linked to Alzheimer’s disease, according to the results of a new animal study published in the March 2005 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. This study specifically investigated one particular kind of omega 3 fatty acids – Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and the results are encouraging.

Omega 3: Fish or Plant?

With the increasing popularity of vegetarian diets and mounting fears about mercury and PCBs in seafood, people often ask about using flax oil (which contains alpha-linolenic acids – or ALA) instead of fish oil.

Our bodies can convert ALA into eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) – the beneficial elements of omega 3 – but the conversion process is slow. In addition, a high concentration of ALA (as present in flax oil pills) has been linked to higher risk of prostate cancer by some early research. Until more is known, men may be safest to choose fish oil for heart-healthy omega 3s instead of concentrated ALA.

http://www.healthcastle.com/omega3.shtml

——

Vitamin D and the immune system: new perspectives on an old theme

Vitamin D and the immune system: new perspectives on an old theme

Martin Hewison, PhD

PUBMED CENTRAL Journal List – NIH Public Access – Autor Manuscript

———-

Journal List > NIHPA Author Manuscripts

Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 June 1.

Published in final edited form as:
Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2010 June; 39(2): 365–379.
doi:  10.1016/j.ecl.2010.02.010
PMCID: PMC2879394
NIHMSID: NIHMS180153
Copyright notice and Disclaimer

Vitamin D and the immune system: new perspectives on an old theme

Martin Hewison, PhD

Martin Hewison, Professor in Residence, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 615 Charles E. Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA;
Corresponding author for proof and reprints: Martin Hewison, PhD, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine UCLA, 615 Charles E. Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA, Tel: 310 206 1625, Fax: 310 825 5409, Email: mhewison@mednet.ucla.edu
The publisher’s final edited version of this article is available at Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am
See other articles in PMC that cite the published article.
Publisher’s Disclaimer
•  Other Sections▼
o Synopsis
o Introduction
o Vitamin D and innate immunity
o Vitamin D and adaptive immunity
o Vitamin D,  the immune system and human health
o Conclusions
o References

Synopsis
Interaction with the immune system is one of the most well-established non-classical effects of vitamin D. For many years this was considered to be a manifestation of granulomatous diseases such sarcoidosis, where synthesis of active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) is known to be dysregulated. However, recent reports have supported a role for 1,25(OH)2D3 in mediating normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Crucially, these effects appear to be mediated via localized autocrine or paracrine synthesis of 1,25(OH)2D3 from precursor 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25OHD3), the main circulating metabolite of vitamin D. As such, the ability of vitamin D to influence normal human immunity will be highly dependent on the vitamin D status of individuals, and may lead to aberrant response to infection or autoimmunity in those who are vitamin D-insufficient. The potential health significance of this has been underlined by increasing awareness of impaired vitamin D status in populations across the globe. The following review article will describe in more detail some of the recent developments with respect to vitamin D and the immune system, together with possible clinical implications.
Keywords: vitamin D, CYP27b1, toll-like receptor, macrophage, cathelicidin, regulatory T-cells
o Vitamin D,  the immune system and human health

Introduction
Historical perspective
Non-classical actions of vitamin D were first recognized thirty years ago when receptors for active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) were detected in various neoplastic cells lines 23,59. Other studies immediately following this showed that binding of 1,25(OH)2D3 to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) promoted antiproliferative and prodifferentiation responses in cancer cells 1,18, highlighting an entirely new facet of vitamin D action. The spectrum of non-classical responses to vitamin D was then extended to include actions on cells from the immune system 2,13. This interaction was further endorsed by the observation that some patients with the granulomatous disease sarcoidosis present with elevated circulating levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 and associated hypercalcemia 11,72. In these patients the high serum 1,25(OH)2D3 is due to increased activity of the enzyme 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1α-hydrooxylase (1α-hydroxylase). However, in contrast to normal subjects where 1α-hydroxylase is classically localized in the kidney, the increased synthesis of 1,25(OH)2D3 in patients with sarcoidosis involves 1α-hydroxylase activity in disease-associated macrophages 4,6,9. Thus, it was concluded that the immune system had the potential to both synthesize 1,25(OH)2D3 and elicit autocrine or paracrine responses from immune cells expressing the vitamin D receptor 38.
Despite these early advances, the precise nature of the interaction between vitamin D and the immune system remained unresolved for many years. Some pieces of the puzzle were easier to complete than others. For example, it became evident that dysregulation of 1,25(OH)2D3 was not restricted to sarcoidosis but was a common feature of many granulomatous disorders and some forms of cancer 39. Likewise, at least in vitro, it was possible to potently regulate a range of immune cell functions using 1,25(OH)2D3 or its synthetic analogs 35,97. However, the key remaining question concerned whether or not vitamin D could act as a physiological regulator of normal immune responses. Answers to this question began to appear about five years ago and new information on the fundamental nature of vitamin D sufficiency/insufficiency has provided a fresh perspective on non-classical actions of vitamin D. As a consequence, there is now a much broader acceptance that vitamin D plays an active role in regulating specific facets of human immunity. This will be detailed in the following review together with discussion on the possible impact of vitamin D insufficiency and vitamin D supplementation on normal immune function and human disease.
•  Other Sections▼
o Synopsis
o Introduction
o Vitamin D and innate immunity
o Vitamin D and adaptive immunity
o Vitamin D,  the immune system and human health
o Conclusions
o References

Vitamin D and innate immunity
Macrophages, vitamin D and cathelicidin
Consistent with the earlier seminal observations of extra-renal 1α-hydroxylase activity in patients with sarcoidosis, the effects of vitamin D on macrophage function have been central to many of the new observations implicating vitamin D in the regulation of immune responses. In common with natural killer cells (NK) and cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (cytotoxic T-cells), macrophages and their monocyte precursors play a central role in initial non-specific immune responses to pathogenic organisms or tissue damage – so called cell-mediated immunity. Their role is to phagocytose pathogens or cell debris and then eliminate or assimilate the resulting waste material. In addition, macrophages can interface with the adaptive immune system by utilizing phagocytic material for antigen presentation to T-lymphocytes (T-cells).

For many years, the key action of vitamin D on macrophages was thought to be its ability to stimulate differentiation of precursor monocytes to more mature phagocytic macrophages 1,2,45,93. This concept was supported by observations showing differential expression of VDR and 1α-hydroxylase during the differentiation of human monocytes macrophages 49. The latter report also emphasized early studies showing that normal human macrophages were able to synthesize 1,25(OH)2D3 when stimulated with interferon gamma (IFNγ) 46. Localized activation of vitamin D, coupled with expression of endogenous VDR was strongly suggestive of an autocrine or intracrine system for vitamin D action in normal monocytes/macrophages.

However, confirmation of such a mechanism was only obtained in 2006 when Robert Modlin and colleagues carried out DNA array analyses to define innate immunity genes that were specifically modulated in monocytes by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). In a seminal investigation both the VDR and the gene for 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) were shown to be induced following activation of the principal pathogen recognition receptor for M. tb, toll-like receptor 2/1 (TLR2/1) 56. Subsequent experiments confirmed that precursor 25OHD3 was able to induce intracrine VDR responses in monocytes that had been treated with a TLR2/1 activator. In particular, the TLR2/1–25OHD3 combination stimulated expression of the antibacterial protein cathelicidin, so that vitamin D was able to promote monocyte killing of M. tb 56. Notably, the ability to promote expression of the antibacterial protein following a TLR2/1 challenge was directly influenced by the 25OHD3 status of the donor serum used for monocyte culture 56. More recently, we have shown that vitamin D supplementation in vivo can also enhance TLR2/1-induced cathelicidin expression 5. Cathelicidin was identified several years ago as a target for transcriptional regulation by 1,25(OH)2D3-liganded VDR, in that its gene promoter contains a functional vitamin D response element (VDRE) 30,100. Interestingly, this VDRE occurs within a small interchangeable nuclear element (SINE) sequence which only appears to be present in the cathelicidin gene promoter of higher primates, suggesting that vitamin D regulation of this facet of innate immunity is a relatively recent evolutionary development 30.

Recent reports have underlined the importance of cathelicidin as a target for vitamin D but also suggest that this mechanism may be more complex than initially thought. As yet, the precise signal system by which TLR activation induces expression of VDR and 1α-hydroxylase remains unclear. Promoter-reporter analysis of the events involved in transcriptional regulation of CYP27B1 suggest that TLR4-mediated induction of the enzyme involves JAK-STAT, MAP kinase and nuclear factor kappB (NF-κB) pathways, and that these synergize with IFNγ-mediated induction of CYP27B192. However, other studies have proposed that TLR2/1 induction of 1α-hydroxylase occurs indirectly as a consequence of TLR2/1 induced interleukin-15 (IL-15) which is a potent inducer of CYP27B1 and 1α-hydroxylase activity 50. In a similar fashion, interleukin 17A (IL-17A) has been shown to enhance 1,25(OH)2D3-mediated induction of cathelicidin, although this response does not appear to involve transcriptional regulation of 1α-hydroxylase or increased VDR sensitivity 77. One pathway that has been poorly studied in this regard concerns the enzyme 24-hydroxylase, which is conventionally considered to function by inactivating 1,25(OH)2D3. The gene for 24-hydroxylase (CYP24) is potently induced by 25OHD3 following TLR2/1 activation of monocytes 56 but, as yet, it is unclear whether this involves the non-metabolic splice variant form of CYP24 known to be expressed by macrophages 82.

Regulation of the antibacterial protein by 1,25(OH)2D3 has been described for a wide variety of cell types other than macrophages, including keratinocytes 84,85,100, lung epithelial cells 104, myeloid cell lines 30,85,100 and placental trophoblasts 54. In some cases 54,84, this appears to involve an intracrine response similar to that reported for monocytes. However, the mechanisms controlling local synthesis of 1,25(OH)2D3 in these cells vary considerably. In keratinocytes, low baseline expression of 1α-hydroxylase is enhanced following epidermal wounding by transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) 84. The resulting rise in 1,25(OH)2D3 concentrations upregulates expression of TLR2 and TLR4 by keratinocytes, thereby priming these cells for further innate immune responses to pathogens or tissue damage 84. By contrast, in trophoblasts, induction of cathelicidin and subsequent bacterial killing by 25OHD3 appears to be due to constitutive 1α-hydroxylase activity, which is not further enhanced by TLR activation 54. The latter may be due to the rapid non-immune induction of 1α-hydroxylase and VDR which occurs within the placenta during early gestation 24.

Although most of the studies of vitamin D-mediated innate immunity have focused on the role of 1,25(OH)2D3-bound VDR as a pivotal transcriptional regulator of cathelicidin, it is also important to recognize that other ligands may interact with the VDR 58. For example, recent studies of bilary epithelial cells have shown that cathelicidin expression can be induced in a VDR-dependent fashion by bile salts 19. This provides a mechanism for maintaining bilary sterility, although additive effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 also highlight a novel therapeutic application for vitamin D in the treatment of primary bilary cirrhosis. Conversely, other compounds may act to disrupt normal 1,25(OH)2D3-VDR-mediated immunity. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo(A)pyrene, a prominent product of cigarette smoking, has been shown to attenuate vitamin D-mediated induction of macrophage cathelcidin in a VDR-dependent fashion by stimulating expression of 24-hydroxylase, and vitamin D catabolism 64. The precise mechanism by which this occurs has yet to be determined but these data suggest that some toxic compounds are actively detrimental to vitamin D-mediated immunity.

The observations detailed above show clearly that vitamin D is a potent stimulator of mechanisms associated with pathogen elimination. In subsequent sections the clinical importance of this with respect to vitamin D insufficiency and immune-related diseases is discussed in more detail. However, one key question that immediately arises from the current observations is why there is a need to involve the vitamin D system in the TLR-induction of innate immunity. As previously described, VDR-mediated transcriptional regulation of cathelicidin is a relatively recent evolutionary change and was presumably advantageous when primates (including early Homo sapiens) were exposed to abundant sunlight, thereby priming high serum levels of vitamin D. Other benefits of incorporating vitamin D into innate immune regulation include the fact that it is associated with key feedback control pathways. As already mentioned, vitamin D has its own catabolic enzyme in the form of 24-hydroxylase which sensitively attenuates responses to 1,25(OH)2D3 and, in the case of the CYP24 splice variant, may also attenuate synthesis of this vitamin D metabolite 82. However, vitamin D may also provide feedback regulation of immune activation pathways in that 1,25(OH)2D3 has been shown to potently downregulate expression of monocyte TLR2 and TLR4, thereby suppressing inflammatory responses that are normally activated by these receptors 83. Thus, by utilizing both CYP24 and TLR regulatory mechanisms, vitamin D may help to promote appropriate innate immune responses whilst preventing an over-elaboration of innate immune responses and the tissue damage frequently associated with this.

Dendritic cells and antigen presentation

In addition to the phagocytic acquisition and elimination of pathogens and cell debris, innate immunity also involves the presentation of resultant antigen to cells involved in the adaptive arm of the immune system (see Figure 1). Although several cells are able to do this, the most well-recognized group of professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) are dendritic cells (DCs). Expression of VDR by purified tissue DCs was first reported in 198715. Subsequent studies using populations of DCs isolated from skin (Langerhans cells) provided evidence that 1,25(OH)2D3 could act to attenuate antigen presentation 20. However, it was not until the later advent of in vitro monocyte-derived DC models that the effects of vitamin D metabolites on antigen presentation were fully elucidated. In 2000 parallel studies by the Adorini and Kumar groups showed that 1,25(OH)2D376 and its synthetic analogs 34 inhibited the maturation of monocyte-derived DCs, thereby suppressing their capacity to present antigen to T-cells. Based on these observations, it was proposed that vitamin D could act to promote tolerance and this was endorsed by studies of pancreatic islet transplantation in which lower rejection rates were observed in 1,25(OH)2D3-treated mice 32. Crucially this response to 1,25(OH)2D3 appeared to be due to decreased DC maturation and concomitant enhancement of suppressor or regulatory T-cells (Treg) 32. Further studies have underlined the importance of Treg generation 68 as part of the interaction between vitamin D and the immune system and this is discussed in greater detail in later sections of this review.

 

Figure 1
Effects of vitamin D on innate and adaptive immunity

Although regulation of DC maturation represents at potential target for 1,25(OH)2D3 and its synthetic analogs as treatment for autoimmune disease and host-graft rejection, another perspective was provided by the observation that DCs express 1α-hydroxylase in a similar fashion to macrophages 25,40. Data from monocyte-derived DCs showed that 1α-hydroxylase expression and activity increases as DCs differentiate towards an a mature phenotype 40. Functional analyses showed that treatment with 25OHD3 suppresses DC maturation and inhibits T-cell proliferation, confirming the existence of an intracrine pathway for vitamin D similar to that observed for macrophages 40. Interestingly, mature DCs showed lower levels of VDR than immature DCs or monocytes 40. This reciprocal organization of 1α-hydroxylase and VDR expression may be advantageous in that mature antigen-presenting DCs may be relatively insensitive to 1,25(OH)2D3, thereby allowing induction of an initial T-cell response. However, the high levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 being synthesized by these cells will be able to act on VDR-expressing immature DCs and thus prevent their further development 41. In this way, paracrine action of locally produced 1,25(OH)2D3 will allow initial presentation of antigen to T-cells whilst preventing continued maturation of DCs and over-stimulation of T-cells.

Although DCs are heterogeneous in terms of their location, phenotype and function, they are broadly divided into two groups based on their origin. Myeloid (mDCs) and plasmacytoid (pDCs) express different types of cytokines and chemokines and appear to exert complementary effects on T-cell responses, with mDCs being the most effective APCs 57 and pDCs being more closely associated with immune tolerance 91. It is therefore interesting to note that 1,25(OH)2D3 preferentially regulates mDCs, suggesting that the key effect of vitamin D in this instance is to suppress activation of naïve T-cells. Although in this study pDCs showed no apparent immune response to 1,25(OH)2D3, this does not preclude a role for vitamin D in the regulation of tolerogenic responses. One possibility is that local, intracrine, synthesis of 1,25(OH)2D3 will be more effective in achieving these responses. Alternatively, 1,25(OH)2D3 synthesized by pDCs may regulate tolerance through paracrine effects on VDR-expressing T-cells. This is discussed in further detail in the following section.

Vitamin D and adaptive immunity
Vitamin D and T-cell function

Resting T-cells express almost undetectable levels of VDR, but levels of the receptor increase as T-cells proliferate following antigenic activation 44,66,78. As a consequence, initial studies of the effects of vitamin D on T-cells focused on the ability of 1,25(OH)2D3 to suppress T-cell proliferation 44,66,78. However, the recognition that CD4+ effector T-cells were capable of considerable phenotypic plasticity, suggested that vitamin D might also influence the phenotype of T-cells. Lemire and colleagues first reported that 1,25(OH)2D3 preferentially inhibited T-helper 1 (Th1) cells which are a subset of CD4+ effector T-cells closely associated with cellular, rather than humoral, immune responses 52. Subsequent studies confirmed this observation and demonstrated that the cytokine profile of 1,25(OH)2D3-treated human T-cells was consistent with Th2 cells, a subset of CD4+ T-cells associated with humoral (antibody)-mediated immunity 14,70. The conclusion from these observations was that vitamin D promotes a T-cell shift from Th1 to Th2 and thus might help to limit the potential tissue damage associated with Th1 cellular immune responses. However, the validity of this generalization was called into question by studies using mouse T-cells in which 1,25(OH)2D3 was shown to inhibit cytokines associated with both Th1 (IFNγ) and Th2 (interleukin-4, IL-4). Subsequent analysis of immune cells from the VDR gene knockout mouse added further confusion by showing that these animals had reduced (rather than the predicted elevated) levels of Th1 cells 69. Thus, whilst in vitro vitamin D appears to broadly support a shift from Th1 to Th2 in CD4+ cells, it seems likely that in vivo its effects on T-cells are more complex.

The T-cell repertoire has continued to expand with the characterization of another effector T-cell lineage distinct from Th1 or Th2 cells, termed Th17 cells because of their capacity to synthesize interleukin-17 (IL-17) 36,101. Th17 cells play an essential role in combating certain pathogens but they have also been linked to tissue damage and inflammation 12,48. The precise role of vitamin D as a regulator of Th17 cells has yet to be fully elucidated but it is interesting to note that studies of animal models of the gastrointestinal inflammatory disease colitis have shown that treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 reduces expression of IL-1721, whilst loss of 1,25(OH)2D3 as a result of CYP27b1 gene ablation leads to elevated levels of this cytokine 55. Thus, it possible that vitamin D exerts some of its effects on inflammation and autoimmune disease through the regulation of Th17 cells.

A fourth group of CD4+ T-cells, exert suppressor rather than effector functions and are known as regulatory T-cells or Tregs. In view of its early recognition as a suppressor of T-cell proliferation, it was anticipated that vitamin D would have effects on Tregs, and indeed in 2002 O’Garra and colleagues demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3, in conjunction with glucocorticoids, potently stimulated the generation of interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing CD4+/CD25+ Tregs 10. Subsequent reports indicated that 1,25(OH)2D3 alone can induce Tregs 31, and it appears that preferential differentiation of Tregs is a pivotal mechanism linking vitamin D and adaptive immunity, with potential beneficial effects for autoimmune disease and host-graft rejection 33,62,89. This immunosuppressive mechanism is likely to be mediated by the induction of tolerogenic DCs as described in the previous section of the review 7,22,32, but direct effects on T-cells may also be important 95. In this latter study, it was notable that 1,25(OH)2D3 increased both IL-10-secretion and TLR9 expression by Tregs, suggesting a novel link between innate and adaptive immune responses 95.

Relative to the wealth of literature on CD4+ effector cells, our understanding of the effects of vitamin D on CD8+ suppressor T-cells remains somewhat limited. In contrast to CD4+ cells, CD8+ show poor antiproliferative response to 1,25(OH)2D378,98,99. However, VDR expression appears to be abundant in CD8+ cells suggesting that they are still potential targets for 1,25(OH)2D3. Indeed subsequent reports have shown that 1,25(OH)2D3 actively regulates cytokine production by CD8+ cells 103, and can also regulate the proliferation of CD8+ cells following specific immune stimuli 43. Despite this, 1,25(OH)2D3 does not appear to have a significant impact on animal disease models such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis where CD8+ cells have been implicated 65.

Although many of the studies linking 1,25(OH)2D3 with adaptive immunity have focused on changes in T-cell proliferation and phenotype, it is important to recognize that other facets of T-cell function may also be affected by the hormone. In particular recent studies have shown that vitamin D can exert powerful effects on the homing of T-cells to specific tissues. Initial studies suggested that 1,25(OH)2D3 acts to inhibit migration of T-cells to lymph nodes 94. However, more recent reports have demonstrated an active role for vitamin D in promoting homing of T-cells to the skin via upregulation of chemokine receptor 10 (CCR10), the ligand for which, CCL27, is expressed by epidermal keratinocytes 87. Notably this T-cell homing response was induced by 25OHD3 as well as 1,25(OH)2D3 and the author suggested that both DCs and T-cells were possible sources of the local 1α-hydroxylase activity 87. In contrast to its positive effect on epidermal T-cell homing, vitamin D appears to exert a negative effect on chemokines and chemokine receptors associated with the GI tract 87. However, it seems likely that this is will be highly T-cell selective as newer studies using the VDR gene knockout mouse have demonstrated aberrant GI migration of a subset of CD8+ cells, and this effects appears to be closely linked to the increased risk of colitis in VDR knockout mice 105.

Vitamin D and B-cell function

Like T-cells, active but not inactive B-cells express the VDR 79. Consequently, initial studies indicated that 1,25(OH)2D3 could directly regulate B-cell proliferation 86 and immunoglobulin (Ig) production 79. Subsequent work contradicted this, suggesting instead that the ability of 1,25(OH)2D3 to suppress proliferation and immunoglobulin (Ig) production was due to indirect effects mediated via helper T-cells 51. However, more recent reports have demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 does indeed exert direct effects on B cell homeostasis 17. In addition to confirming direct VDR-mediated effects on B cell proliferation and Ig production, this study also highlighted the ability of 1,25(OH)2D3 to inhibit the differentiation of plasma cells and class switched memory cells, suggesting a potential role for vitamin D in B cell-related disorders such as systemic lupus erythamtosus. Notably, expression of CYP27b1 was also detected in B-cells, indicating that B-cells may be capable of autocrine/intracrine responses to vitamin D 17. Indeed, this may be common to lymphocytes in general as CYP27b1 expression has also been detected in T-cells 87.

Vitamin D, the immune system and human health

For many years vitamin D status was defined simply by whether or not the patient in question exhibited symptoms of the bone disease rickets (osteomalacia in adults). However, an entirely new perspective on vitamin D status has arisen from the observation that serum levels of the main circulating form of vitamin D (25OHD3) as high as 75 nM correlate inversely with parathyroid hormone 16. This, has prompted the introduction of a new term – vitamin D ‘insufficiency’ – defined by serum levels of 25OHD3 that are sub-optimal (< 75 nM) but not necessarily rachitic (< 20 nM) 42. Unlike serum concentrations of 1,25(OH)2D3, which are primarily defined by the endocrine regulators of the vitamin D-activating enzyme, 1α-hydroxylase, circulating levels of 25OHD3 are a direct reflection of vitamin D status, which for any given individual will depend on access to vitamin D either through exposure to sunlight or through dietary intake. The net effect of this is that vitamin D status can vary significantly in populations depending on geographical, social or economic factors. As a result of these new parameters for vitamin D status, a consensus statement from the 13th Workshop on Vitamin D concluded that vitamin D insufficiency was a worldwide epidemic. Moreover, recent studies have shown that in the last ten years alone, serum vitamin D levels have on average fallen by 20% 28. The key question now being considered is what is the physiological and clinical impact of global vitamin D insufficiency beyond classical bone diseases such as rickets? Epidemiological studies have highlighted possible links between vitamin D insufficiency and a wide range of human diseases 42. The final section of the review will describe four of the key clinical problems which have been linked to the immunomodulatory properties of vitamin D.

Vitamin D and tuberculosis

The observation that vitamin D acts to promote innate immune responses to TLR-activation by M. tb 56, has provided a new perspective on observations made many decades ago concerning the beneficial effects of UV light exposure on the disease TB. As a consequence this has become the most well studied facet of the interaction between vitamin D and innate immunity 60. Initial studies to assess the effects of 25OHD status on ex vivo macrophage function have shown that supplementation with a single oral dose of 2.5 mg vitamin D enhances the ability of recipient macrophages to combat BCG infection in vitro 61. The potential benefits of vitamin D as treatment for tuberculosis (TB) have been further endorsed by a study which showed that adjunct vitamin D supplementation (0.25 mg vitamin D/day) of TB patients receiving conventional therapy for the disease reduced the time for sputum smear conversion from acid fast bacteria (AFB) positive to AFB-negative status 67. A recent double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial showed that vitamin D supplementation had no effect on clinical outcomes or mortality amongst TB patients, although it should be emphasized that none of the supplemented patients in this study showed a significant rise in serum vitamin D levels 102.

Vitamin D and multiple sclerosis

Several epidemiology studies have reported association between vitamin D insufficiency and the incidence and/or severity of the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis (MS) (reviewed in 80. These observations have been supported by analysis of animal models such as the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse, which shows increased disease severity under dietary vitamin D restriction 88. Conversely administration of 1,25(OH)2D3 to EAE mice confers disease protection through effects on cytokine synthesis and apoptosis of inflammatory cells 75,90. Some effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 on EAE appear to be dependent on IL-10 activity 89.

Vitamin D and type 1 diabetes

In common with MS, published reports suggest that there is a link between vitamin D deficiency and another autoimmune disease, type 1 diabetes (reviewed in 63). Low circulating levels of 25OHD3 have been reported in adolescents at the time of diagnosis of type 1 diabetes 53, and other data have documented the beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation in protecting against type 1 diabetes 37. Another strand of evidence linking vitamin D with type 1 diabetes stems from the extensive genetic analyses that have explored the physiological impact of inherited variations in the genes for various components of the vitamin D metabolic and signaling system. Previous studies have indicated that some VDR gene haplotypes confer protection against diabetes 81 and more recently this has been expanded to show that genetic variants of the CYP27b1 gene also affect susceptibility to type 1 diabetes 8. Finally, in a similar fashion to animal model studies for MS, in vivo use of the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse as a model for type 1 diabetes has shown increased disease severity under conditions of dietary vitamin D restriction 29.

Vitamin D and Crohn’s disease

Several strands of evidence have linked vitamin D to the dysregulated immune responses observed with inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn’s disease. Firstly, epidemiology suggests that patients with Crohn’s disease have decreased serum levels of 25OHD373,74,96. Secondly, studies in vivo using various animal models indicate that 1,25(OH)2D3 plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of experimentally-induced forms of inflammatory bowel disease 26,27,47,55. Finally, expression of 1α-hydroxylase has been detected in the human colon 106, with the vitamin D-activating enzyme being upregulated in disease-affected tissue from patients with Crohn’s disease 3. In the case of the latter, dysregulated colonic expression of 1α-hydroxylase was associated with increased circulating levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 indicating that, as with sarcoidosis, localized synthesis of this vitamin D metabolite can spill-over into the general circulation under conditions of persistent disease 3. Intriguingly, current studies have implicated aberrant innate immune handling of enteric microbiota as an initiator of the adaptive immune damage associated with Crohn’s disease 71. It is thus tempting to speculate that effects of vitamin D on this disease may involve both the activation of innate immunity, together with the suppression of adaptive immunity and associated inflammation.

Conclusions

It is almost thirty years since an interaction between vitamin D and the immune system was first documented. Although this was initially proposed as a non-classical effect of vitamin D associated with granulomatous diseases, our current view is now considerably changed. Recent studies have demonstrated a potential physiological role for vitamin D in regulating normal innate and adaptive immunity. Future studies will now need to focus on the clinical implications of vitamin D-mediated immunity and, in particular, the possible beneficial effects of supplementary vitamin D with respect to infectious and autoimmune diseases.

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by NIH grant RO1AR050626 to M.H.
Footnotes

This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final citable form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain.

References

1. Abe E, Miyaura C, Sakagami H, et al. Differentiation of mouse myeloid leukemia cells induced by 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1981;78:4990. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

2. Abe E, Miyaura C, Tanaka H, et al. 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 promotes fusion of mouse alveolar macrophages both by a direct mechanism and by a spleen cell-mediated indirect mechanism. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1983;80:5583. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

3. Abreu MT, Kantorovich V, Vasiliauskas EA, et al. Measurement of vitamin D levels in inflammatory bowel disease patients reveals a subset of Crohn’s disease patients with elevated 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and low bone mineral density. Gut. 2004;53:1129. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

4. Adams JS, Gacad MA. Characterization of 1 alpha-hydroxylation of vitamin D3 sterols by cultured alveolar macrophages from patients with sarcoidosis. J Exp Med. 1985;161:755. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

5. Adams JS, Ren S, Liu PT, et al. Vitamin d-directed rheostatic regulation of monocyte antibacterial responses. J Immunol. 2009;182:4289. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

6. Adams JS, Sharma OP, Gacad MA, et al. Metabolism of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 by cultured pulmonary alveolar macrophages in sarcoidosis. J Clin Invest. 1983;72:1856. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

7. Adorini L, Penna G, Giarratana N, et al. Dendritic cells as key targets for immunomodulation by Vitamin D receptor ligands. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2004;89–90:437.

8. Bailey R, Cooper JD, Zeitels L, et al. Association of the vitamin D metabolism gene CYP27B1 with type 1 diabetes. Diabetes. 2007

9. Barbour GL, Coburn JW, Slatopolsky E, et al. Hypercalcemia in an anephric patient with sarcoidosis: evidence for extrarenal generation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. N Engl J Med. 1981;305:440. [PubMed]

10. Barrat FJ, Cua DJ, Boonstra A, et al. In vitro generation of interleukin 10-producing regulatory CD4(+) T cells is induced by immunosuppressive drugs and inhibited by T helper type 1 (Th1)- and Th2-inducing cytokines. J Exp Med. 2002;195:603. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

11. Bell NH, Stern PH, Pantzer E, et al. Evidence that increased circulating 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D is the probable cause for abnormal calcium metabolism in sarcoidosis. J Clin Invest. 1979;64:218. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

12. Bettelli E, Korn T, Kuchroo VK. Th17: the third member of the effector T cell trilogy. Curr Opin Immunol. 2007;19:652. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

13. Bhalla AK, Amento EP, Serog B, et al. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibits antigen-induced T cell activation. J Immunol. 1984;133:1748. [PubMed]

14. Boonstra A, Barrat FJ, Crain C, et al. 1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin d3 has a direct effect on naive CD4(+) T cells to enhance the development of Th2 cells. J Immunol. 2001;167:4974. [PubMed]

15. Brennan A, Katz DR, Nunn JD, et al. Dendritic cells from human tissues express receptors for the immunoregulatory vitamin D3 metabolite, dihydroxycholecalciferol. Immunology. 1987;61:457. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

16. Chapuy MC, Preziosi P, Maamer M, et al. Prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in an adult normal population. Osteoporos Int. 1997;7:439. [PubMed]

17. Chen S, Sims GP, Chen XX, et al. Modulatory effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin d3 on human B cell differentiation. J Immunol. 2007;179:1634. [PubMed]

18. Colston K, Colston MJ, Feldman D. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and malignant melanoma: the presence of receptors and inhibition of cell growth in culture. Endocrinology. 1981;108:1083. [PubMed]

19. D’Aldebert E, Biyeyeme Bi Mve MJ, Mergey M, et al. Bile salts control the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin through nuclear receptors in the human biliary epithelium. Gastroenterology. 2009;136:1435. [PubMed]

20. Dam TN, Moller B, Hindkjaer J, et al. The vitamin D3 analog calcipotriol suppresses the number and antigen-presenting function of Langerhans cells in normal human skin. J Investig Dermatol Symp Proc. 1996;1:72.

21. Daniel C, Sartory NA, Zahn N, et al. Immune modulatory treatment of TNBS colitis with calcitriol is associated with a change of a Th1/Th17 to a Th2 and regulatory T cell profile. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2007

22. Dong X, Bachman LA, Kumar R, et al. Generation of antigen-specific, interleukin-10-producing T-cells using dendritic cell stimulation and steroid hormone conditioning. Transpl Immunol. 2003;11:323. [PubMed]

23. Eisman JA, Martin TJ, MacIntyre I, et al. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D-receptor in breast cancer cells. Lancet. 1979;2:1335. [PubMed]

24. Evans KN, Bulmer JN, Kilby MD, et al. Vitamin D and placental-decidual function. J Soc Gynecol Investig. 2004;11:263.

25. Fritsche J, Mondal K, Ehrnsperger A, et al. Regulation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1 alpha-hydroxylase and production of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 by human dendritic cells. Blood. 2003;102:3314. [PubMed]

26. Froicu M, Cantorna MT. Vitamin D and the vitamin D receptor are critical for control of the innate immune response to colonic injury. BMC Immunol. 2007;8:5. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

27. Froicu M, Weaver V, Wynn TA, et al. A crucial role for the vitamin D receptor in experimental inflammatory bowel diseases. Mol Endocrinol. 2003;17:2386. [PubMed]

28. Ginde AA, Liu MC, Camargo CA., Jr Demographic differences and trends of vitamin D insufficiency in the US population, 1988–2004. Arch Intern Med. 2009;169:626. [PubMed]

29. Giulietti A, Gysemans C, Stoffels K, et al. Vitamin D deficiency in early life accelerates Type 1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice. Diabetologia. 2004;47:451. [PubMed]

30. Gombart AF, Borregaard N, Koeffler HP. Human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) gene is a direct target of the vitamin D receptor and is strongly up-regulated in myeloid cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Faseb J. 2005;19:1067. [PubMed]

31. Gorman S, Kuritzky LA, Judge MA, et al. Topically applied 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 enhances the suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+ cells in the draining lymph nodes. J Immunol. 2007;179:6273. [PubMed]

32. Gregori S, Casorati M, Amuchastegui S, et al. Regulatory T cells induced by 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and mycophenolate mofetil treatment mediate transplantation tolerance. J Immunol. 2001;167:1945. [PubMed]

33. Gregori S, Giarratana N, Smiroldo S, et al. A 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) analog enhances regulatory T-cells and arrests autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. Diabetes. 2002;51:1367. [PubMed]

34. Griffin MD, Lutz WH, Phan VA, et al. Potent inhibition of dendritic cell differentiation and maturation by vitamin D analogs. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2000;270:701. [PubMed]

35. Griffin MD, Xing N, Kumar R. Vitamin D and its analogs as regulators of immune activation and antigen presentation. Annu Rev Nutr. 2003;23:117. [PubMed]

36. Harrington LE, Mangan PR, Weaver CT. Expanding the effector CD4 T-cell repertoire: the Th17 lineage. Curr Opin Immunol. 2006;18:349. [PubMed]

37. Harris SS. Vitamin D in type 1 diabetes prevention. J Nutr. 2005;135:323. [PubMed]

38. Hewison M. Vitamin D and the immune system. J Endocrinol. 1992;132:173. [PubMed]

39. Hewison M, Burke F, Evans KN, et al. Extra-renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1alpha-hydroxylase in human health and disease. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007;103:316. [PubMed]

40. Hewison M, Freeman L, Hughes SV, et al. Differential regulation of vitamin D receptor and its ligand in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. J Immunol. 2003;170:5382. [PubMed]

41. Hewison M, Zehnder D, Chakraverty R, et al. Vitamin D and barrier function: a novel role for extra-renal 1 alpha-hydroxylase. Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2004;215:31. [PubMed]

42. Holick MF. Vitamin D deficiency. N Engl J Med. 2007;357:266. [PubMed]

43. Iho S, Iwamoto K, Kura F, et al. Mechanism in 1,25(OH)2D3-induced suppression of helper/suppressor function of CD4/CD8 cells to immunoglobulin production in B cells. Cell Immunol. 1990;127:12. [PubMed]

44. Karmali R, Hewison M, Rayment N, et al. 1,25(OH)2D3 regulates c-myc mRNA levels in tonsillar T lymphocytes. Immunology. 1991;74:589. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

45. Koeffler HP, Amatruda T, Ikekawa N, et al. Induction of macrophage differentiation of human normal and leukemic myeloid stem cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and its fluorinated analogues. Cancer Res. 1984;44:5624. [PubMed]

46. Koeffler HP, Reichel H, Bishop JE, et al. gamma-Interferon stimulates production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 by normal human macrophages. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1985;127:596. [PubMed]

47. Kong J, Zhang Z, Musch MW, et al. Novel Role of the Vitamin D Receptor in Maintaining the Integrity of the Intestinal Mucosal Barrier. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2007

48. Korn T, Oukka M, Kuchroo V, et al. Th17 cells: effector T cells with inflammatory properties. Semin Immunol. 2007;19:362. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

49. Kreutz M, Andreesen R, Krause SW, et al. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 production and vitamin D3 receptor expression are developmentally regulated during differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages. Blood. 1993;82:1300. [PubMed]

50. Krutzik SR, Hewison M, Liu PT, et al. IL-15 links TLR2/1-induced macrophage differentiation to the vitamin D-dependent antimicrobial pathway. J Immunol. 2008;181:7115. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

51. Lemire JM, Adams JS, Sakai R, et al. 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 suppresses proliferation and immunoglobulin production by normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. J Clin Invest. 1984;74:657. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

52. Lemire JM, Archer DC, Beck L, et al. Immunosuppressive actions of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3: preferential inhibition of Th1 functions. J Nutr. 1995;125:1704S. [PubMed]

53. Littorin B, Blom P, Scholin A, et al. Lower levels of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D among young adults at diagnosis of autoimmune type 1 diabetes compared with control subjects: results from the nationwide Diabetes Incidence Study in Sweden (DISS) Diabetologia. 2006;49:2847. [PubMed]

54. Liu N, Kaplan AT, Low J, et al. Vitamin D Induces Innate Antibacterial Responses in Human Trophoblasts via an Intracrine Pathway. Biol Reprod. 2009;80:398. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

55. Liu N, Nguyen L, Chun RF, et al. Altered endocrine and autocrine metabolism of vitamin D in a mouse model of gastrointestinal inflammation. Endocrinology. 2008;149:4799. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

56. Liu PT, Stenger S, Li H, et al. Toll-like receptor triggering of a vitamin D-mediated human antimicrobial response. Science. 2006;311:1770. [PubMed]

57. Liu YJ. IPC: professional type 1 interferon-producing cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cell precursors. Annu Rev Immunol. 2005;23:275. [PubMed]

58. Makishima M, Lu TT, Xie W, et al. Vitamin D receptor as an intestinal bile acid sensor. Science. 2002;296:1313. [PubMed]

59. Manolagas SC, Haussler MR, Deftos LJ. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptors in cancer. Lancet. 1980;1:828. [PubMed]

60. Martineau AR, Honecker FU, Wilkinson RJ, et al. Vitamin D in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007;103:793. [PubMed]

61. Martineau AR, Wilkinson RJ, Wilkinson KA, et al. A single dose of vitamin d enhances immunity to mycobacteria. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007;176:208. [PubMed]

62. Mathieu C, Badenhoop K. Vitamin D and type 1 diabetes mellitus: state of the art. Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2005;16:261. [PubMed]

63. Mathieu C, Gysemans C, Giulietti A, et al. Vitamin D and diabetes. Diabetologia. 2005;48:1247. [PubMed]

64. Matsunawa M, Amano Y, Endo K, et al. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activator Benzo[a]pyrene Enhances Vitamin D3 Catabolism in Macrophages. Toxicol Sci. 2009

65. Meehan TF, DeLuca HF. CD8(+) T cells are not necessary for 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2002;99:5557. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

66. Nunn JD, Katz DR, Barker S, et al. Regulation of human tonsillar T-cell proliferation by the active metabolite of vitamin D3. Immunology. 1986;59:479. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

67. Nursyam EW, Amin Z, Rumende CM. The effect of vitamin D as supplementary treatment in patients with moderately advanced pulmonary tuberculous lesion. Acta Med Indones. 2006;38:3. [PubMed]

68. O’Garra A, Barrat FJ. In vitro generation of IL-10-producing regulatory CD4+ T cells is induced by immunosuppressive drugs and inhibited by Th1- and Th2-inducing cytokines. Immunol Lett. 2003;85:135. [PubMed]

69. O’Kelly J, Hisatake J, Hisatake Y, et al. Normal myelopoiesis but abnormal T lymphocyte responses in vitamin D receptor knockout mice. J Clin Invest. 2002;109:1091. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

70. Overbergh L, Decallonne B, Waer M, et al. 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 induces an autoantigen-specific T-helper 1/T-helper 2 immune shift in NOD mice immunized with GAD65 (p524–543) Diabetes. 2000;49:1301. [PubMed]

71. Packey CD, Sartor RB. Commensal bacteria, traditional and opportunistic pathogens, dysbiosis and bacterial killing in inflammatory bowel diseases. Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2009;22:292. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

72. Papapoulos SE, Clemens TL, Fraher LJ, et al. 1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol in the pathogenesis of the hypercalcaemia of sarcoidosis. Lancet. 1979;1:627. [PubMed]

73. Pappa HM, Gordon CM, Saslowsky TM, et al. Vitamin D status in children and young adults with inflammatory bowel disease. Pediatrics. 2006;118:1950. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

74. Pappa HM, Grand RJ, Gordon CM. Report on the vitamin D status of adult and pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease and its significance for bone health and disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2006;12:1162. [PubMed]

75. Pedersen LB, Nashold FE, Spach KM, et al. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 reverses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inhibiting chemokine synthesis and monocyte trafficking. J Neurosci Res. 2007;85:2480. [PubMed]

76. Penna G, Adorini L. 1 Alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibits differentiation, maturation, activation, and survival of dendritic cells leading to impaired alloreactive T cell activation. J Immunol. 2000;164:2405. [PubMed]

77. Peric M, Koglin S, Kim SM, et al. IL-17A enhances vitamin D3-induced expression of cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide in human keratinocytes. J Immunol. 2008;181:8504. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

78. Provvedini DM, Manolagas SC. 1 Alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor distribution and effects in subpopulations of normal human T lymphocytes. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1989;68:774. [PubMed]

79. Provvedini DM, Tsoukas CD, Deftos LJ, et al. 1 alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3-binding macromolecules in human B lymphocytes: effects on immunoglobulin production. J Immunol. 1986;136:2734. [PubMed]

80. Raghuwanshi A, Joshi SS, Christakos S. Vitamin D and multiple sclerosis. J Cell Biochem. 2008;105:338. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

81. Ramos-Lopez E, Jansen T, Ivaskevicius V, et al. Protection from type 1 diabetes by vitamin D receptor haplotypes. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2006;1079:327. [PubMed]

82. Ren S, Nguyen L, Wu S, et al. Alternative splicing of vitamin D-24-hydroxylase: a novel mechanism for the regulation of extrarenal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D synthesis. J Biol Chem. 2005;280:20604. [PubMed]

83. Sadeghi K, Wessner B, Laggner U, et al. Vitamin D3 down-regulates monocyte TLR expression and triggers hyporesponsiveness to pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Eur J Immunol. 2006;36:361. [PubMed]

84. Schauber J, Dorschner RA, Coda AB, et al. Injury enhances TLR2 function and antimicrobial peptide expression through a vitamin D-dependent mechanism. J Clin Invest. 2007;117:803. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

85. Schauber J, Dorschner RA, Yamasaki K, et al. Control of the innate epithelial antimicrobial response is cell-type specific and dependent on relevant microenvironmental stimuli. Immunology. 2006;118:509. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

86. Shiozawa K, Shiozawa S, Shimizu S, et al. 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibits pokeweed mitogen-stimulated human B-cell activation: an analysis using serum-free culture conditions. Immunology. 1985;56:161. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

87. Sigmundsdottir H, Pan J, Debes GF, et al. DCs metabolize sunlight-induced vitamin D3 to ‘program’ T cell attraction to the epidermal chemokine CCL27. Nat Immunol. 2007;8:285. [PubMed]

88. Spach KM, Hayes CE. Vitamin D3 confers protection from autoimmune encephalomyelitis only in female mice. J Immunol. 2005;175:4119. [PubMed]

89. Spach KM, Nashold FE, Dittel BN, et al. IL-10 signaling is essential for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-mediated inhibition of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. J Immunol. 2006;177:6030. [PubMed]

90. Spach KM, Pedersen LB, Nashold FE, et al. Gene expression analysis suggests that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 reverses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by stimulating inflammatory cell apoptosis. Physiol Genomics. 2004;18:141. [PubMed]

91. Steinman RM, Hawiger D, Nussenzweig MC. Tolerogenic dendritic cells. Annu Rev Immunol. 2003;21:685. [PubMed]

92. Stoffels K, Overbergh L, Giulietti A, et al. Immune regulation of 25-hydroxyvitamin-d(3)-1alpha-hydroxylase in human monocytes. J Bone Miner Res. 2006;21:37. [PubMed]

93. Tanaka H, Abe E, Miyaura C, et al. 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 induces differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) into monocyte-macrophages, but not into granulocytes. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1983;117:86. [PubMed]

94. Topilski I, Flaishon L, Naveh Y, et al. The anti-inflammatory effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on Th2 cells in vivo are due in part to the control of integrin-mediated T lymphocyte homing. Eur J Immunol. 2004;34:1068. [PubMed]

95. Urry Z, Xystrakis E, Richards DF, et al. Ligation of TLR9 induced on human IL-10-secreting Tregs by 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 abrogates regulatory function. J Clin Invest. 2009;119:387. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

96. Vagianos K, Bector S, McConnell J, et al. Nutrition assessment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2007;31:311. [PubMed]

97. Van Etten E, Decallonne B, Verlinden L, et al. Analogs of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 as pluripotent immunomodulators. J Cell Biochem. 2003;88:223. [PubMed]

98. Vanham G, Ceuppens JL, Bouillon R. T lymphocytes and their CD4 subset are direct targets for the inhibitory effect of calcitriol. Cell Immunol. 1989;124:320. [PubMed]

99. Veldman CM, Cantorna MT, DeLuca HF. Expression of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) receptor in the immune system. Arch Biochem Biophys. 2000;374:334. [PubMed]

100. Wang TT, Nestel FP, Bourdeau V, et al. Cutting edge: 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 is a direct inducer of antimicrobial peptide gene expression. J Immunol. 2004;173:2909. [PubMed]

101. Weaver CT, Hatton RD, Mangan PR, et al. IL-17 family cytokines and the expanding diversity of effector T cell lineages. Annu Rev Immunol. 2007;25:821. [PubMed]

102. Wejse C, Gomes VF, Rabna P, et al. Vitamin D as supplementary treatment for tuberculosis: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2009;179:843. [PubMed]

103. Willheim M, Thien R, Schrattbauer K, et al. Regulatory effects of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on the cytokine production of human peripheral blood lymphocytes. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1999;84:3739. [PubMed]

104. Yim S, Dhawan P, Ragunath C, et al. Induction of cathelicidin in normal and CF bronchial epithelial cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) J Cyst Fibros. 2007;6:403. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

105. Yu S, Bruce D, Froicu M, et al. Failure of T cell homing, reduced CD4/CD8alphaalpha intraepithelial lymphocytes, and inflammation in the gut of vitamin D receptor KO mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008;105:20834. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

106. Zehnder D, Bland R, Williams MC, et al. Extrarenal expression of 25-hydroxyvitamin d(3)-1 alpha-hydroxylase. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2001;86:888. [PubMed]
________________________________________ PubMed articles by these authors
• Hewison, M.
PubMed related articles
• Review Vitamin D and innate and adaptive immunity.
Hewison M. Vitam Horm. 2011; 86:23-62.
[Vitam Horm. 2011]
• Review Vitamin D and inflammation.
Guillot X, Semerano L, Saidenberg-Kermanac’h N, Falgarone G, Boissier MC. Joint Bone Spine. 2010 Dec; 77(6):552-7. Epub 2010 Nov 9.
[Joint Bone Spine. 2010]
• Review Vitamin D: modulator of the immune system.
Baeke F, Takiishi T, Korf H, Gysemans C, Mathieu C. Curr Opin Pharmacol. 2010 Aug; 10(4):482-96. Epub 2010 Apr 27.
[Curr Opin Pharmacol. 2010]
• Review Vitamin D and the intracrinology of innate immunity.
Hewison M. Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2010 Jun 10; 321(2):103-11. Epub 2010 Feb 13.
[Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2010]
• Review Role of vitamin D in immune responses and autoimmune diseases, with emphasis on its role in multiple sclerosis.
Zhang HL, Wu J. Neurosci Bull. 2010 Dec; 26(6):445-54.
[Neurosci Bull. 2010]
• » See reviews… | » See all…
Recent Activity

Clear Turn Off Turn On
• Vitamin D and the immune system: new perspectives on an old themeVitamin D and the immune system: new perspectives on an old theme
• Vitamin D and the immune system: new perspectives on an old theme.Vitamin D and the immune system: new perspectives on an old theme.
• Therapeutic potential of vitamin D for multiple sclerosis.Therapeutic potential of vitamin D for multiple sclerosis.
• Dietary intake of vitamin D during adolescence and risk of multiple sclerosis.Dietary intake of vitamin D during adolescence and risk of multiple sclerosis.
• Vitamin D for the management of multiple sclerosis.Vitamin D for the management of multiple sclerosis.
Your browsing activity is empty.
Activity recording is turned off.
Turn recording back on
Links
• Compound
• PubMed
• Substance
• Taxonomy
• Taxonomy Tree

• 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D-receptor in breast cancer cells.
Lancet. 1979 Dec 22-29; 2(8156-8157):1335-6.
[Lancet. 1979]
• 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptors in cancer.
Lancet. 1980 Apr 12; 1(8172):828.
[Lancet. 1980]
• Differentiation of mouse myeloid leukemia cells induced by 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1981 Aug; 78(8):4990-4.
[Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1981]
• 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and malignant melanoma: the presence of receptors and inhibition of cell growth in culture.
Endocrinology. 1981 Mar; 108(3):1083-6.
[Endocrinology. 1981]
• 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 promotes fusion of mouse alveolar macrophages both by a direct mechanism and by a spleen cell-mediated indirect mechanism.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1983 Sep; 80(18):5583-7.
[Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1983]
See more articles cited in this paragraph
• Extra-renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1alpha-hydroxylase in human health and disease.
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007 Mar; 103(3-5):316-21.
[J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007]
• ReviewVitamin D and its analogs as regulators of immune activation and antigen presentation.
Annu Rev Nutr. 2003; 23():117-45.
[Annu Rev Nutr. 2003]
• ReviewAnalogs of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 as pluripotent immunomodulators.
J Cell Biochem. 2003 Feb 1; 88(2):223-6.
[J Cell Biochem. 2003]

• Differentiation of mouse myeloid leukemia cells induced by 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1981 Aug; 78(8):4990-4.
[Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1981]
• 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 promotes fusion of mouse alveolar macrophages both by a direct mechanism and by a spleen cell-mediated indirect mechanism.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1983 Sep; 80(18):5583-7.
[Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1983]
• Induction of macrophage differentiation of human normal and leukemic myeloid stem cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and its fluorinated analogues.
Cancer Res. 1984 Dec; 44(12 Pt 1):5624-8.
[Cancer Res. 1984]
• 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 induces differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) into monocyte-macrophages, but not into granulocytes.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1983 Nov 30; 117(1):86-92.
[Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1983]
• 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 production and vitamin D3 receptor expression are developmentally regulated during differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages.
Blood. 1993 Aug 15; 82(4):1300-7.
[Blood. 1993]
See more articles cited in this paragraph
• Toll-like receptor triggering of a vitamin D-mediated human antimicrobial response.
Science. 2006 Mar 24; 311(5768):1770-3.
[Science. 2006]
• Vitamin d-directed rheostatic regulation of monocyte antibacterial responses.
J Immunol. 2009 Apr 1; 182(7):4289-95.
[J Immunol. 2009]
• Human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) gene is a direct target of the vitamin D receptor and is strongly up-regulated in myeloid cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.
FASEB J. 2005 Jul; 19(9):1067-77.
[FASEB J. 2005]
• Cutting edge: 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 is a direct inducer of antimicrobial peptide gene expression.
J Immunol. 2004 Sep 1; 173(5):2909-12.
[J Immunol. 2004]

• Immune regulation of 25-hydroxyvitamin-D3-1alpha-hydroxylase in human monocytes.
J Bone Miner Res. 2006 Jan; 21(1):37-47.
[J Bone Miner Res. 2006]
• IL-15 links TLR2/1-induced macrophage differentiation to the vitamin D-dependent antimicrobial pathway.
J Immunol. 2008 Nov 15; 181(10):7115-20.
[J Immunol. 2008]
• IL-17A enhances vitamin D3-induced expression of cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide in human keratinocytes.
J Immunol. 2008 Dec 15; 181(12):8504-12.
[J Immunol. 2008]
• Toll-like receptor triggering of a vitamin D-mediated human antimicrobial response.
Science. 2006 Mar 24; 311(5768):1770-3.
[Science. 2006]
• Alternative splicing of vitamin D-24-hydroxylase: a novel mechanism for the regulation of extrarenal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D synthesis.
J Biol Chem. 2005 May 27; 280(21):20604-11.
[J Biol Chem. 2005]

• Injury enhances TLR2 function and antimicrobial peptide expression through a vitamin D-dependent mechanism.
J Clin Invest. 2007 Mar; 117(3):803-11.
[J Clin Invest. 2007]
• Control of the innate epithelial antimicrobial response is cell-type specific and dependent on relevant microenvironmental stimuli.
Immunology. 2006 Aug; 118(4):509-19.
[Immunology. 2006]
• Cutting edge: 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 is a direct inducer of antimicrobial peptide gene expression.
J Immunol. 2004 Sep 1; 173(5):2909-12.
[J Immunol. 2004]
• Induction of cathelicidin in normal and CF bronchial epithelial cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3).
J Cyst Fibros. 2007 Nov 30; 6(6):403-10.
[J Cyst Fibros. 2007]
• Human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) gene is a direct target of the vitamin D receptor and is strongly up-regulated in myeloid cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.
FASEB J. 2005 Jul; 19(9):1067-77.
[FASEB J. 2005]
See more articles cited in this paragraph
• Vitamin D receptor as an intestinal bile acid sensor.
Science. 2002 May 17; 296(5571):1313-6.
[Science. 2002]
• Bile salts control the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin through nuclear receptors in the human biliary epithelium.
Gastroenterology. 2009 Apr; 136(4):1435-43.
[Gastroenterology. 2009]

• Alternative splicing of vitamin D-24-hydroxylase: a novel mechanism for the regulation of extrarenal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D synthesis.
J Biol Chem. 2005 May 27; 280(21):20604-11.
[J Biol Chem. 2005]
• Vitamin D3 down-regulates monocyte TLR expression and triggers hyporesponsiveness to pathogen-associated molecular patterns.
Eur J Immunol. 2006 Feb; 36(2):361-70.
[Eur J Immunol. 2006]

• Dendritic cells from human tissues express receptors for the immunoregulatory vitamin D3 metabolite, dihydroxycholecalciferol.
Immunology. 1987 Aug; 61(4):457-61.
[Immunology. 1987]
• 1 Alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibits differentiation, maturation, activation, and survival of dendritic cells leading to impaired alloreactive T cell activation.
J Immunol. 2000 Mar 1; 164(5):2405-11.
[J Immunol. 2000]
• Potent inhibition of dendritic cell differentiation and maturation by vitamin D analogs.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2000 Apr 21; 270(3):701-8.
[Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2000]
• Regulatory T cells induced by 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and mycophenolate mofetil treatment mediate transplantation tolerance.
J Immunol. 2001 Aug 15; 167(4):1945-53.
[J Immunol. 2001]
• ReviewIn vitro generation of IL-10-producing regulatory CD4+ T cells is induced by immunosuppressive drugs and inhibited by Th1- and Th2-inducing cytokines.
Immunol Lett. 2003 Jan 22; 85(2):135-9.
[Immunol Lett. 2003]

• Regulation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1 alpha-hydroxylase and production of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 by human dendritic cells.
Blood. 2003 Nov 1; 102(9):3314-6.
[Blood. 2003]
• Differential regulation of vitamin D receptor and its ligand in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.
J Immunol. 2003 Jun 1; 170(11):5382-90.
[J Immunol. 2003]
• ReviewVitamin D and barrier function: a novel role for extra-renal 1 alpha-hydroxylase.
Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2004 Feb 27; 215(1-2):31-8.
[Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2004]

• ReviewIPC: professional type 1 interferon-producing cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cell precursors.
Annu Rev Immunol. 2005; 23():275-306.
[Annu Rev Immunol. 2005]
• ReviewTolerogenic dendritic cells.
Annu Rev Immunol. 2003; 21():685-711.
[Annu Rev Immunol. 2003]

• 1,25(OH)2D3 regulates c-myc mRNA levels in tonsillar T lymphocytes.
Immunology. 1991 Dec; 74(4):589-93.
[Immunology. 1991]
• Regulation of human tonsillar T-cell proliferation by the active metabolite of vitamin D3.
Immunology. 1986 Dec; 59(4):479-84.
[Immunology. 1986]
• 1 Alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor distribution and effects in subpopulations of normal human T lymphocytes.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1989 Apr; 68(4):774-9.
[J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1989]
• ReviewImmunosuppressive actions of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3: preferential inhibition of Th1 functions.
J Nutr. 1995 Jun; 125(6 Suppl):1704S-1708S.
[J Nutr. 1995]
• 1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin d3 has a direct effect on naive CD4(+) T cells to enhance the development of Th2 cells.
J Immunol. 2001 Nov 1; 167(9):4974-80.
[J Immunol. 2001]
See more articles cited in this paragraph
• ReviewExpanding the effector CD4 T-cell repertoire: the Th17 lineage.
Curr Opin Immunol. 2006 Jun; 18(3):349-56.
[Curr Opin Immunol. 2006]
• ReviewIL-17 family cytokines and the expanding diversity of effector T cell lineages.
Annu Rev Immunol. 2007; 25():821-52.
[Annu Rev Immunol. 2007]
• ReviewTh17: the third member of the effector T cell trilogy.
Curr Opin Immunol. 2007 Dec; 19(6):652-7.
[Curr Opin Immunol. 2007]
• ReviewTh17 cells: effector T cells with inflammatory properties.
Semin Immunol. 2007 Dec; 19(6):362-71.
[Semin Immunol. 2007]
• Altered endocrine and autocrine metabolism of vitamin D in a mouse model of gastrointestinal inflammation.
Endocrinology. 2008 Oct; 149(10):4799-808.
[Endocrinology. 2008]

• In vitro generation of interleukin 10-producing regulatory CD4(+) T cells is induced by immunosuppressive drugs and inhibited by T helper type 1 (Th1)- and Th2-inducing cytokines.
J Exp Med. 2002 Mar 4; 195(5):603-16.
[J Exp Med. 2002]
• Topically applied 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 enhances the suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+ cells in the draining lymph nodes.
J Immunol. 2007 Nov 1; 179(9):6273-83.
[J Immunol. 2007]
• A 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) analog enhances regulatory T-cells and arrests autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.
Diabetes. 2002 May; 51(5):1367-74.
[Diabetes. 2002]
• ReviewVitamin D and type 1 diabetes mellitus: state of the art.
Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Aug; 16(6):261-6.
[Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2005]
• IL-10 signaling is essential for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-mediated inhibition of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.
J Immunol. 2006 Nov 1; 177(9):6030-7.
[J Immunol. 2006]
See more articles cited in this paragraph
• 1 Alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor distribution and effects in subpopulations of normal human T lymphocytes.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1989 Apr; 68(4):774-9.
[J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1989]
• T lymphocytes and their CD4 subset are direct targets for the inhibitory effect of calcitriol.
Cell Immunol. 1989 Dec; 124(2):320-33.
[Cell Immunol. 1989]
• Expression of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) receptor in the immune system.
Arch Biochem Biophys. 2000 Feb 15; 374(2):334-8.
[Arch Biochem Biophys. 2000]
• Regulatory effects of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on the cytokine production of human peripheral blood lymphocytes.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1999 Oct; 84(10):3739-44.
[J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1999]
• Mechanism in 1,25(OH)2D3-induced suppression of helper/suppressor function of CD4/CD8 cells to immunoglobulin production in B cells.
Cell Immunol. 1990 Apr 15; 127(1):12-25.
[Cell Immunol. 1990]
See more articles cited in this paragraph
• The anti-inflammatory effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on Th2 cells in vivo are due in part to the control of integrin-mediated T lymphocyte homing.
Eur J Immunol. 2004 Apr; 34(4):1068-76.
[Eur J Immunol. 2004]
• DCs metabolize sunlight-induced vitamin D3 to ‘program’ T cell attraction to the epidermal chemokine CCL27.
Nat Immunol. 2007 Mar; 8(3):285-93.
[Nat Immunol. 2007]
• Failure of T cell homing, reduced CD4/CD8alphaalpha intraepithelial lymphocytes, and inflammation in the gut of vitamin D receptor KO mice.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Dec 30; 105(52):20834-9.
[Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008]

• 1 alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3-binding macromolecules in human B lymphocytes: effects on immunoglobulin production.
J Immunol. 1986 Apr 15; 136(8):2734-40.
[J Immunol. 1986]
• 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibits pokeweed mitogen-stimulated human B-cell activation: an analysis using serum-free culture conditions.
Immunology. 1985 Sep; 56(1):161-7.
[Immunology. 1985]
• 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 suppresses proliferation and immunoglobulin production by normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.
J Clin Invest. 1984 Aug; 74(2):657-61.
[J Clin Invest. 1984]
• Modulatory effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on human B cell differentiation.
J Immunol. 2007 Aug 1; 179(3):1634-47.
[J Immunol. 2007]
• DCs metabolize sunlight-induced vitamin D3 to ‘program’ T cell attraction to the epidermal chemokine CCL27.
Nat Immunol. 2007 Mar; 8(3):285-93.
[Nat Immunol. 2007]

• Prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in an adult normal population.
Osteoporos Int. 1997; 7(5):439-43.
[Osteoporos Int. 1997]
• ReviewVitamin D deficiency.
N Engl J Med. 2007 Jul 19; 357(3):266-81.
[N Engl J Med. 2007]
• Demographic differences and trends of vitamin D insufficiency in the US population, 1988-2004.
Arch Intern Med. 2009 Mar 23; 169(6):626-32.
[Arch Intern Med. 2009]

• Toll-like receptor triggering of a vitamin D-mediated human antimicrobial response.
Science. 2006 Mar 24; 311(5768):1770-3.
[Science. 2006]
• ReviewVitamin D in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007 Mar; 103(3-5):793-8.
[J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007]
• A single dose of vitamin D enhances immunity to mycobacteria.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Jul 15; 176(2):208-13.
[Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007]
• The effect of vitamin D as supplementary treatment in patients with moderately advanced pulmonary tuberculous lesion.
Acta Med Indones. 2006 Jan-Mar; 38(1):3-5.
[Acta Med Indones. 2006]
• Vitamin D as supplementary treatment for tuberculosis: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2009 May 1; 179(9):843-50.
[Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2009]

• ReviewVitamin D and multiple sclerosis.
J Cell Biochem. 2008 Oct 1; 105(2):338-43.
[J Cell Biochem. 2008]
• Vitamin D3 confers protection from autoimmune encephalomyelitis only in female mice.
J Immunol. 2005 Sep 15; 175(6):4119-26.
[J Immunol. 2005]
• 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 reverses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inhibiting chemokine synthesis and monocyte trafficking.
J Neurosci Res. 2007 Aug 15; 85(11):2480-90.
[J Neurosci Res. 2007]
• Gene expression analysis suggests that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 reverses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by stimulating inflammatory cell apoptosis.
Physiol Genomics. 2004 Jul 8; 18(2):141-51.
[Physiol Genomics. 2004]
• IL-10 signaling is essential for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-mediated inhibition of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.
J Immunol. 2006 Nov 1; 177(9):6030-7.
[J Immunol. 2006]

• ReviewVitamin D and diabetes.
Diabetologia. 2005 Jul; 48(7):1247-57.
[Diabetologia. 2005]
• Lower levels of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D among young adults at diagnosis of autoimmune type 1 diabetes compared with control subjects: results from the nationwide Diabetes Incidence Study in Sweden (DISS).
Diabetologia. 2006 Dec; 49(12):2847-52.
[Diabetologia. 2006]
• ReviewVitamin D in type 1 diabetes prevention.
J Nutr. 2005 Feb; 135(2):323-5.
[J Nutr. 2005]
• Protection from type 1 diabetes by vitamin D receptor haplotypes.
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2006 Oct; 1079():327-34.
[Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2006]
• Vitamin D deficiency in early life accelerates Type 1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.
Diabetologia. 2004 Mar; 47(3):451-62.
[Diabetologia. 2004]

• Vitamin D status in children and young adults with inflammatory bowel disease.
Pediatrics. 2006 Nov; 118(5):1950-61.
[Pediatrics. 2006]
• ReviewReport on the vitamin D status of adult and pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease and its significance for bone health and disease.
Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2006 Dec; 12(12):1162-74.
[Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2006]
• Nutrition assessment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2007 Jul-Aug; 31(4):311-9.
[JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2007]
• Vitamin D and the vitamin D receptor are critical for control of the innate immune response to colonic injury.
BMC Immunol. 2007 Mar 30; 8():5.
[BMC Immunol. 2007]
• A crucial role for the vitamin D receptor in experimental inflammatory bowel diseases.
Mol Endocrinol. 2003 Dec; 17(12):2386-92.
[Mol Endocrinol. 2003]
See more articles cited in this paragraph
You are here: NCBI > Literature > PubMed Central
Write to the Help Desk
Simple NCBI Directory
• Getting Started
• NCBI Education
• NCBI Help Manual
• NCBI Handbook
• Training & Tutorials
• Resources
• Chemicals & Bioassays
• Data & Software
• DNA & RNA
• Domains & Structures
• Genes & Expression
• Genetics & Medicine
• Genomes & Maps
• Homology
• Literature
• Proteins
• Sequence Analysis
• Taxonomy
• Training & Tutorials
• Variation
• Popular
• PubMed
• Nucleotide
• BLAST
• PubMed Central
• Gene
• Bookshelf
• Protein
• OMIM
• Genome
• SNP
• Structure
• Featured
• GenBank
• Reference Sequences
• Map Viewer
• Genome Projects
• Human Genome
• Mouse Genome
• Influenza Virus
• Primer-BLAST
• Sequence Read Archive
• NCBI Information
• About NCBI
• Research at NCBI
• NCBI Newsletter
• NCBI FTP Site
• NCBI on Facebook
• NCBI on Twitter
• NCBI on YouTube
NLM
NIH
DHHS
USA.gov
Copyright | Disclaimer | Privacy | Accessibility | Contact
National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA

Disponivel em
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2879394/?tool=pubmed
——–

POR UM NOVO PARADIGMA DE CONDUTA E TRATAMENTO

Por um novo Paradigma
de Conduta e Tratamento

POR UM NOVO PARADIGMA DE CONDUTA E TRATAMENTO

Por Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra
Médico Internista e Neurologista
Professor Associado Livre-Docente da Universidade Federal de São Paulo
Presidente do Instituto de Investigação e Tratamento de Autoimunidade

 


O Instituto de Investigação e Tratamento de Autoimunidade (“Instituto de Autoimunidade”) foi criado no primeiro semestre de 2011, a partir da iniciativa deste médico signatário e de ex-pacientes (atualmente seus amigos) que apresentavam manifestações autoimunitárias, e que foram beneficiados com o tratamento a eles oferecido. Atualmente essas pessoas possuem um nível normal de qualidade de vida, mantendo-se livres das agressões do sistema imunológico, ao ponto de considerarem-se ex-portadores da doença e participam da direção do Instituto de Autoimunidade, idealisticamente voltados para viabilizarem o mesmo benefício para outros pacientes, especialmente os mais carentes.

Os relatos espontâneos dos pacientes beneficiados geraram grande repercussão nas comunidades da rede mundial de computadores, originando a demanda pelas atividades a que se propõe o Instituto de Autoimunidade.O alvo das atividades do Instituto de Autoimunidade volta-se para a identificação e pcorreção de distúrbios metabólicos causadores das doenças autoimunitárias, iniara a cialmente com especial atenção para a correção da deficiência de vitamina D, hoje amplamente reconhecida por diversos membros da comunidade científica internacional como fator primordial no surgimento e exacerbação da atividade de doenças autoimunitárias e outras doenças graves, tais como câncer.


A “vitamina D” (ou “colecalciferol”) é, na realidade, atualmente considerada um pré-hormônio no meio científico (pois é transformada em diversas células do organismo humano no hormônio calcitriol – hormônio esse potencialmente capaz de modificar 229 funções biológicas no organismo humano – referência 1). A utilização do colecalciferol como tratamento via oral (desde que em doses fisiologicamente realistas – próximas daquelas obtidas através da exposição solar abundante) tem baixo custo e alta efetividade; mostra-se capaz de manter os pacientes sem os prejuízos físicos, psíquicos e sociais relacionados às doenças autoimunitárias, além de promover a regressão potencialmente completa de sequelas recentemente adquiridas, o bem-estar e a autoconfiança do paciente.

Poupa-se ao sistema de saúde público e privado vultosos gastos com internações hospitalares e medicamentos dispendiosos, ensejando-se a um grande número de pacientes uma vida essencialmente normal e produtiva, livrando-os de uma sobrevivência na condição de doentes crônicos, incapacitados para o trabalho e dependentes do sistema previdenciário. Enfatiza-se que não se trata de um tratamento alternativo, mas de fato de reconstituir o mecanismo que a própria natureza desenvolveu com o objetivo de evitar a agressão autoimunitária contra o próprio organismo.Em vista do conflito com interesses relacionados ao comércio de medicamentos (que mensalmente movimenta somas bilionárias) que atravanca a absorção desses conhecimentos mais recentes pela comunidade médica, o Instituto de Investigação e Tratamento de Autoimunidade assume já como força motriz inspiradora de suas atividades, desde a sua fundação, o fundamental compromisso de difundir as bases desse tratamento para outros profissionais médicos, para que se tornem também eles elementos difusores dessa terapia, dessa forma contribuindo para o encurtamento do tempo que será gasto para que um número maior de pacientes sejam beneficiados.


O conhecimento científico atual revela que a deficiência de vitamina D (que afeta 76.5% de moradores na cidade de São Paulo durante o inverno, baixando para apenas 37.3% durante o verão (segundo pesquisas publicadas por pesquisadores da USP e da UNIFESP em 2010 – referência 2) está associado à ocorrência (suscetibilidade) e à sustentação (gravidade) de virtualmente todas as doenças ou manifestações autoimunitárias, incluindo-se a esclerose múltipla, neurite óptica, doença de Devic, doença de Guillain-Barré (poliradiculo-neurite), polineuropatia, miastenia gravis, artrite reumatóide, lúpus (discóide ou eritematoso sistêmico), doença de Crohn, retocolite ulcerativa, doença celíaca, cirrose biliar primária, hipotireoidismo (tireoidite de Hashimoto), uveíte, episclerite, psoríase, vitiligo, abortos no primeiro trimestre da gestação, doença periodontal, diabete infanto-juvenil, alergias, etc. Também encontram-se associados à deficiência de vitamina D (facilitados, induzidos ou favorecidos por ela) outros distúrbios ou doenças não autoimunitárias (ou ainda não classificadas como autoimunitárias pela ciência contemporânea), tais como câncer, hipertensão, diabete da maturidade, acidentes cardiovasculares, osteopenia e osteoporose, depressão, distúrbio bipolar, esquizofrenia, infertilidade, malformações congênitas, dor crônica (incluindo-se a fibromialgia e a enxaqueca), doenças neurodegenerativas (como Parkinson e Alzheimer), sonolência excessiva, etc.

Evidências epidemiológicas recentes indicam que o autismo é provavelmente causado ou pelo menos grandemente facilitado pela deficiência grave de vitamina D ocorrendo durante a gestação da criança afetada.Atualmente existem inúmeras fontes científicas que evidenciam a imperiosa necessidade ética de não se permitir que quaisquer pessoas (sejam pacientes portadores ou não dessas doenças ou distúrbios) sejam mantidos com deficiência de vitamina D – o que segue acontecendo também em decorrência da habitual suplementação de apenas 200 UI por dia na prática médica comum. Com essas doses irrisórias, um paciente portador de esclerose múltipla passa de um nível circulante de vitamina D médio de 14 ng/ml para apenas 16 ng/ml depois de 2 meses de tratamento. Os valores circulantes de referência para a vitamina D [medida sob a forma de 25(OH)D3, nunca (!) sob a forma de 1,25(OH)2D3] são de 30-100 ng/ml para a grande maioria dos laboratórios clínicos. Enfatiza-se que o nível de 30 ng/ml seria ainda inferior ao adequado segundo cientistas internacionais sérios e éticos, que propõem como ideal os níveis de ao menos 40-50 ng/ml de 25(OH)D3 para uma pessoa normal. As pesquisas mais recentes, no entanto, têm demonstrado que os portadores de doenças autoimunitárias, por razões genéticas (referências 3 e 4), são parcialmente resistentes aos efeitos do colecalciferol, necessitando, portanto, de níveis ainda mais elevados para estarem livres das agressões do seu próprio sistema imunológico. Nesses casos, o nível adequado somente pode ser estabelecido mediante o acompanhamento clínico e laboratorial que permita o ajuste da dose conforme a necessidade individual de cada paciente, sem o risco de efeitos colaterais graves, especialmente sobre a função renal.


Constituem-se em indivíduos com maior risco deficiência de vitamina D e maior risco se sofrerem complicações graves decorrentes dessa alteração metabólica, aquelas pessoas [1] com idade avançada (a pele de um indivíduo idoso de 70 anos produz apenas um quarto da quantidade de vitamina D produzida por um jovem de 20 anos de idade); [2] com sobre-peso (a gordura acumulada sob a pele sequestra a vitamina D da circulação; em geral a necessidade de vitamina D nesses indivíduos é duplicada em relação a uma pessoa com peso normal para a mesma estatura); [3] com pele escura (a melanina reduz a absorção dos raios solares matinais produtores de vitamina D); [4] que trabalham ou estudam ou exercem suas atividades rotineiras exclusivamente em ambientes confinados, isolados da luz solar da manhã ou do final da tarde; [5] que, mal orientados, utilizam filtros solares de forma indiscriminada, em horários (tais como no período inicial da manhã) em que a exposição solar é absolutamente necessária para a abundante produção de vitamina D na pele descoberta e para preservação da saúde (fator de proteção solar de nível 8 reduz em 90% a produção de vitamina D; o uso de fator de proteção de nível 15 reduz em 99% essa produção); [6] que vivem em localidades mais distantes da linha do Equador, onde a radiação solar é limitada por invernos mais longos, dias mais curtos, e são utilizadas roupas que cobrem uma maior extensão de pele para proteção contra o frio.


É importante que se enfatize, no entanto, que mesmo em localidades próximas do Equador, o problema já se tornou muito similar, devido [1] à ampliação da malha viária de metrô com estacionamentos cobertos próprios, e ocasionalmente com acesso direto ao interior de centros comerciais, [2] à construção de um número crescente de centros comerciais (“shopping centers” – onde famílias inteiras passam várias horas de seus finais de semana, em lugar de frequentarem praias, parques, zoológicos e jardins botânicos); [3] ao uso de películas protetoras nos pára-brisas e janelas dos carros, [4] à construção de estacionamentos subterrâneos sob os prédios residenciais e comerciais, com acesso direto ao elevador; [5] à adesão crescente às diversões e passatempos encontrados no próprio ambiente doméstico, proporcionadas pelos jogos eletrônicos, canais de TV a cabo, DVDs, “Blu Rays”, e pela interatividade crescente proporcionada pela rede mundial de computadores. Pais e mães sentem-se confortáveis vendo seus filhos entretidos com essas atividades domésticas de lazer, por perceberem que assim se mantém distantes da violência urbana.

Enquanto isso o percentual de crianças com diabete do tipo I cresce 6% ao ano na Europa; todas essas características da vida urbana moderna permitem ao indivíduo contemporâneo deslocar-se e realizar praticamente qualquer atividade no meio urbano com exposição solar virtualmente nula.Evidencia-se que três fatores, atuando em conjunto, contribuem para um efeito desastroso para a saúde pública e para os gastos públicos e privados nesse setor e no setor previdenciário: [1] o grande percentual de indivíduos afetados, especialmente na população urbana; [2] o grande número de doenças e distúrbios provocados ou facilitados pela deficiência de um hormônio que potencialmente participa da regulação de 229 funções biológicas no organismo humano; [3] à desinformação da maior parte da classe médica, que há muitas décadas segue temerosa de administrar pela via oral (preventiva ou terapeuticamente, a indivíduos adultos) doses absolutamente fisiológicas, tais como 10.000 UI por dia, que são produzidas por pessoas de pele clara durante meros 20 minutos de exposição ao sol da manhã, sem protetor solar. Tal indivíduo teria de ingerir 100 copos de leite para inteirar a mesma quantidade de vitamina D, que é também 50 vezes superior à dose diária de 200 UI (a mais comumente prescrita por ser erroneamente divulgada como “recomendada”).

Assim, evidencia-se como absolutamente vital e urgente uma mudança de paradigma em relação ao potencial preventivo e terapêutico proporcionado por doses bem mais elevadas de colecalciferol do que aquelas correntemente utilizadas, especialmente em pacientes que, por motivos próprios de sua condição clínica, têm limitações para expor-se ao sol, tal como os portadores de lúpus (pela possibilidade de piora das lesões de pele induzida pelos raios UV), vitiligo (pela facilidade de dano à pele) e esclerose múltipla (pela intolerância ao calor). Ao serem aconselhados a evitarem a exposição solar, têm agravada a deficiência de vitamina D, e em consequência, agrava-se a doença autoimunitária.


É profundamente lamentável que milhares de pessoas jovens, em todo o Brasil, portadoras de esclerose múltipla, estejam tornando-se cegas e paraplégicas apenas por falta de uma substância que poderia ser administrada sob a forma de gotas, em uma única dose diária, o que lhes devolveria a perspectiva certa de uma vida normal.Não há justificativa para não corrigir-se qualquer alteração ou deficiência metabólica que possa ser corrigida, mesmo na ausência de sinais clínicos detectáveis de possíveis consequências danosas à saúde. Fazê-lo é obrigação! Não fazê-lo pode ser encarado como negligência ou resultado de desinformação. O médico não pode deixar sob risco a saúde do paciente que o procura, mesmo para prevenção. Prevenção é e será sempre a melhor abordagem, seja de forma individualizada, ou como política governamental de saúde pública.

O que dizer do caso do paciente que já é portador de uma doença autoimunitária, tal como a esclerose múltipla, cuja alta frequência de surtos e elevada severidade das sequelas neurológicas (paraplegia, cegueira) correlaciona-se com os níveis circulantes mais baixos de vitamina D (referência 5)? Como justificar-se o hábito de sequer solicitar-se a medida das concentrações de 25(OH)D3 no paciente portador, quanto mais de não administrar-se doses realisticamente capazes de corrigir a deficiência que, segundo a literatura especializada, é praticamente certa? Como aceitar-se a passividade frente a um distúrbio metabólico de fácil correção, quanto a administração de doses muito mais elevadas (do que aquelas irrisórias e injustificadamente chamadas de “recomendadas”) que levam à redução das lesões ativas (referência 6) e foram demonstradas serem perfeitamente seguras (referências 6 e 7)? Como aceitar tal passividade, sabendo-se que já em 1986 (há 25 anos) demonstrou-se que doses bem mais modestas (8 vezes inferiores àquelas demonstradas como seguras, mas ainda assim 25 vezes superiores às “recomendadas” pelo comportamento terapêutico convencional) mostraram-se capazes de reduzir em mais de 50% a frequência de surtos em portadores de esclerose múltipla (referência 8)? Qual a justificativa para que qualquer médico, mesmo em face desses dados, simplesmente volte as costas a essa questão e deixe o paciente (cuja saúde encontra-se sob sua responsabilidade profissional) com uma deficiência metabólica cuja correção é, por si mesma (independentemente da presença de qualquer doença), ética e tecnicamente obrigatória, e que poderia poupar seu paciente portador de esclerose múltipla do sofrimento intenso e permanente provocado por sequelas graves, irreversíveis e incapacitantes, tais como a cegueira e a paraplegia?


Como propor estudos “controlados” para a correção de qualquer hipovitaminose (não somente a hipovitaminose D), quando tais estudos são eticamente inviáveis, da mesma forma como não se pode administrar placebos para crianças diabéticas (deficientes em insulina) para “assegurar-se” de que a eficiência da administração de insulina seja “cientificamente” comprovada? O mesmo ocorre para a deficiência de vitaminas como o ácido fólico em gestantes. Seria ético verificar-se “de forma controlada” que um número muito maior de crianças nasceram com anencefalia ou outras malformações congênitas no “grupo placebo”? Tais estudos nunca foram e jamais serão feitos. Seria correto, então, não administrar-se o ácido fólico às gestantes portadoras de níveis baixos desse micronutriente, sob a justificativa de que “não existem estudos controlados”?


Evidentemente, ao contrário do estudo da efetividade de drogas alopáticas, a avaliação da eficiência da correção de qualquer distúrbio metabólico não pode ser “controlada” com o uso de placebo. A inexistência de tais estudos não pode justificar a não correção de qualquer alteração metabólica, pois se constitui em argumento falacioso identificado em estudos de lógica e estatística (referência 9).

É pensamento compartilhado por todos os membros da diretoria do Instituto de Autoimunidade, que os sentimentos e percepções que devem nortear o tratamento dos pacientes afetados por essas e outras doenças são o senso humanitário, a capacidade de empatia e a genuína vontade de auxiliar, ajudar, servir, minorar o sofrimento e restabelecer a saúde. Nesse sentido, impõe-se radical mudança de paradigma de investigação e tratamento, abandonando-se o foco no exclusivo uso crônico de drogas que, por seus efeitos colaterais, deterioram a qualidade de vida do paciente, além de colocarem em risco sua integridade física e sua vida, sem perspectiva de uma solução em qualquer prazo. Como novo paradigma a ser buscado, qualquer padrão de comportamento, alteração ou distúrbio metabólico que potencialmente contribua para o desencadeamento, sustentação e/ou agravamento da doença deve ser identificado e corrigido, sempre que essa correção for possível, com o objetivo de alcançar o desaparecimento dos sintomas, a solução do problema e a libertação do uso crônico de medicamentos.

Cícero Galli Coimbra
Médico Internista e Neurologista
Professor Associado Livre-Docente da Universidade Federal de São Paulo
Presidente do Instituto de Investigação e Tratamento de Autoimunidade

 

REFERÊNCIAS:

1 – Ramagopalan, S.V., Heger, A., Berlanga, A.J., Maugeri, N.J.,Lincoln, M.R., Burrell, A., Handunnetthi, L., Handel, A.E., Disanto,G., Orton, S.M., Watson, C.T., Morahan, J.M., Giovannoni, G., Ponting,C.P., Ebers, G.C., Knight, J.C. A ChIP-seq defined genome-wide map ofvitamin D receptor binding: associations with disease and evolution.Genome research 2010; 20:1352-1360. – http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2945184/

2 – Unger, M.D., Cuppari, L., Titan, S.M., Magalhaes, M.C., Sassaki,A.L., dos Reis, L.M., Jorgetti, V., Moyses, R.M. Vitamin D status in asunny country: where has the sun gone? Clinical nutrition 2010; 29,784-788 – http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0261561410001111

3 – Pani, M.A., Regulla, K., Segni, M., Krause, M., Hofmann, S.,Hufner, M., Herwig, J., Pasquino, A.M., Usadel, K.H., Badenhoop, K.Vitamin D 1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP1alpha) polymorphism in Graves’disease, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes mellitus.European Journal of Endocrinology 2002; 146:777-781.
http://eje-online.org/content/146/6/777.long

4 – Sundqvist, E., Baarnhielm, M., Alfredsson, L., Hillert, J., Olsson,T., Kockum, I. Confirmation of association between multiple sclerosisand CYP27B1. European journal of human genetics : European Journal ofHuman Genetics 2010; 18:1349-1352. – http://www.nature.com/ejhg/journal/v18/n12/full/ejhg2010113a.html

5 – Smolders, J., Menheere, P., Kessels, A., Damoiseaux, J., Hupperts,R. Association of vitamin D metabolite levels with relapse rate and disability in multiple sclerosis. Multiple Sclerosis 2008; http://msj.sagepub.com/content/14/9/1220

6 – Kimball, S.M., Ursell, M.R., O’Connor, P., Vieth, R. Safety ofvitamin D3 in adults with multiple sclerosis. American Journal ofClinical Nutrition 2007; 86:645-651. – http://www.ajcn.org/content/86/3/645.long

7 – Garland, C.F., French, C.B., Baggerly, L.L., Heaney, R.P. Vitamin Dsupplement doses and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the range associatedwith cancer prevention. Anticancer Research 2011; 31:607-11- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21378345?dopt=Abstract

8 – Goldberg, P., Fleming, M.C., Picard, E.H. Multiple sclerosis: decreased relapse rate through dietary supplementation with calcium, magnesium and vitamin D. Medical hypotheses 1986; 21: 193-200. – http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0306987786900101

9 – Altman, D.G., Bland, J.M.. Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. British Medical Journal 1995; 311:485. – http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2550545/

http://www.institutodeautoimunidade.org.br/novo-paradigma.html

—-                                                

 

conheça Instituto de Investigação e Tratamento da Autoimunidade

Instituto de Investigação e Tratamento da Autoimunidade

http://www.institutodeautoimunidade.org.br/

 
 A Luz que faltava no Brasil

Relatos espontâneos de portadores de doenças autoimunitárias, beneficiados pelo protocolo de tratamento fundamentado na administração de colecalciferol (Vitamina D), geraram grande repercussão nas comunidades sociais da rede mundial de computadores.Este fato suscitou na demanda pela extensão dos mesmos benefícios a outros pacientes, especialmente os mais carentes.

 

 

O filme “Vitamina D — Por uma outra terapia”, produzido entre 2011 e 2012, conta a história de seis portadores de doenças autoimunitárias

O filme “Vitamina D Por uma outra terapia”

com Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erAgu1XcY-U&feature=share

O filme “Vitamina D — Por uma outra terapia”, produzido entre 2011 e 2012, conta a história de seis portadores de doenças autoimunitárias

informações:
vitaminadporumaoutraterapia.wordpress.com

(a maioria com esclerose múltipla) que tiveram suas vidas transformadas por um tratamento à base de vitamina D.

Com direção de Daniel Cunha, jornalista, portador de esclerose múltipla e beneficiário do mesmo tratamento, o documentário surgiu da necessidade de compartilhar esse conhecimento com outros portadores

 

Créditos:

Direção e montagem: Daniel Cunha
Produção e direção de arte: Tunay Canepari
Fotografia e câmeras: Luiz Pires
Locução: Geraldo Barreto
Ilustração: Catarina Bessell
Trilha sonora original: Emiliano Cosacov
Correção de cor: Alexandre Cristófaro
Edição de áudio: Guilherme Vorhaas

Imagens Surf: Joyce Grisotto
Imagens Estúdio: Pablo Moreno (Estúdio 12×8)

———

Importancia da vitamina D e do metabolismo

 Importancia da vitamina D e do metabolismo         

 

O que os cientistas e pesquisadores têm certeza há anos, a contar dos primeiros anos da década de 2000 e antes já sabiam, é da importancia da vitamina D para doenças autoimunes, cardiovasculares, câncer e diabetes. Porque, como muitos explicaram,  Collen Hayes e Cícero Galli Coimbra, dentre cientistas por exemplo, foi preciso descobrir o motivo porque, mesmo em territórios de clima temperado, alguns grupos de pessoas desenvolviam esclerose múltipla e outros não. Alimentação apropriada foi a explicação. O alto consumo de peixes de águas geladas, cuja gordura é rica em Vitamina D, Omega3, como também o consumo de óleo de fígado de bacalhau, forneceu ao sangue humano a hormona 25hidroxivitamin D e as pessoas não desenvolveram nem raquitismo nem esclerose múltipla, embora tivessem a herança genética da doença. Hoje já se sabe que a vitamina D é o link que faltava também para o Alzheimer.

MUITOS AUTORES EXPOEM PESQUISA NO MESMO SENTIDO

Lembro quando da noticia destas pesquisas. Há quem escreveu, li na internet, que isto não é verdade. Porem, “The role of vitamin D in multiple sclerosis” é pesquisa acompanhada de centenas e milhares de outras varias em idêntico sentido. Doutores, de todos os países do planeta, vêm mostrando a importancia da vitamina D para outras doenças também, muito alem da esclerose múltipla. Basta fazer pesquisa e escrever: vitamin d multiple sclerosis  ou vitamin d Alzheimer ou o mesmo com qualquer outra patollogia que se pretenda pesquisar, câncer, diabetes, artrite reumatoide, psoriase, e muitas outras.

A internet brasileira tem informação em portugues. Aqui no Brasil, o primeiro médico a oferecer este conhecimento publicamente foi Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra  [PHD Médico Neurologista e Professor Livre-Docente,  Departamento de Neurologia e Neurocirurgia – Universidade Federal de São Paulo – Unifesp/EPM]. Alguns artigos e entrevista com Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra:

 

Vitamina D é importantíssima para a saúde

Disponível em http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/category/a-prevencao-de-doencas-neurodegenerativas/

 

Vitamina D pode revolucionar o tratamento da esclerose múltipla*

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2010/08/03/vitamina-d-pode-revolucionar-o-tratamento-da-esclerose-multipla/

*Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra
PHD Médico Neurologista e Professor Livre-Docente

 

A cura com Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra. Estresse emocional, depressão, doenças autoimunes e neurodegenerativas. A importancia da Vitamina D.

“Comentário: a principal razão pela qual a medicina atual desdenha estes importantes conhecimentos médicos já antigos e com ampla fundamentação na história recente da medicina e confirmados em vários países, através de diversas publicações, é simplesmente porque ela está subordinada aos interesses extremamente gananciosos da indústria farmacêutica internacional.”

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2011/03/23/informacoes-medicas-sobre-a-prevencao-e-tratamento-de-doencas-neurodegenerativas-e-auto-imunes-como-parkinson-alzheimer-lupus-psoriase-vitiligo-depressao/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRQkITHjZ5k&feature=player_embedded#

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/category/doencas-autoimunes/

—-

O que é possível dizer em breves palavras, já oferece um quadro preocupante. A insuficiência de vitamina D tem desenvolvido muitas outras doenças, alem do raquitismo e da osteoporose, que já são aceitas como “comuns” e típicas da medicina das doenças crônicas.

Associadas á deficiencia de vitamina D estão o câncer, as diabetes, problemas cardiovasculares, transtorno bipolar, autismo, mal de Alzheimer e esquizofrenia, psoríase, depressão.  O comercio industrial multimilionário da farmácia, não traz a cura, apresenta medicação cara e talvez paliativa. Diz assim a medicina das doenças crônicas: “a sua doença não tem cura”… E, no entanto, todas essas doenças graves sequer teriam desenvolvido nas pessoas, se existisse o cuidado com a medicina preventiva com a suplementação da vitamina D.

Os médicos vêm apresentando pesquisa que aponta o aumento de epidemias em todo planeta, por causa da falta de investimento dos governos em saúde preventiva com suplementação da vitamina D.

Vitamin D deficiency: a global perspective        https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/vitamin-d-deficiency-a-global-perspective/

Deficiência de vitamina D: uma epidemia global

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/deficiencia-de-vitamina-d-uma-epidemia-global/

Symposium: Vitamin D Insufficiency: A Significant Risk Factor in Chronic Diseases and Potential Disease-Specific Biomarkers of Vitamin D Sufficiency Vitamin D Intake: A Global Perspective of Current Status

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/symposium-vitamin-d-insufficiency-a-significant-risk-factor-in-chronic-diseases-and-potential-disease-specific-biomarkers-of-vitamin-d-sufficiency-vitamin-d-intake-a-global-perspective-of-current-s/

Brasil ainda investe pouco em saúde País investe apenas 8,7% do valor arrecadado com impostos em saúde. Número é inferior ao de países como Argentina, Chile e Venezuela Um estudo realizado pela Fundação Instituto de Administração da Universidade de São Paulo (USP)

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/05/brasil-ainda-investe-pouco-em-saude/

O aumento da Deficiência de vitamina D geralmente se apresentava como deformidade óssea (raquitismo) ou hipocalcemia na infância e como dor músculoesquelética e fraqueza em adultos.

 

Hoje os estudos são avançados e os médicos constataram muitos outros problemas de saúde, incluindo doenças cardiovasculares, diabetes, vários tipos de câncer, e autoimunes como mal de Alzheimer e esclerose múltipla, hipo e hipertireoidismo, artrite, vitiligo,associadas á alta insuficiência de vitamina D no sangue.

O status da vitamina D é mais confiável determinado pelo ensaio de soro de 25-hidroxivitamina D (25-OHD).

O consenso entre os médicos definiu a medida da nanoterapia como ideal acima de 50. Abaixo de 50 já existe deficiencia mesmo que a pessoa ainda não apresente qualquer sintoma de doença. Isto significa que há meio de baixo custo para a prevenção de epidemias. A suplementação e reposição da colecalciferol, a vitamina D3 a vitamina D3, deve ser feita em altas doses. Muito alem das convencionadas mg da medicina do passado, para ter uma idéia uma gota da solução de colecalciferol tem 1.000 UI [unidade internacional].

O espectro dessas doenças comuns e graves, é particularmente preocupante porque os estudos observacionais têm demonstrado que a insuficiência de vitamina D, Raquitismo em crianças e osteomalacia em adultos são apenas manifestações clássicas de deficiência de vitamina D profunda.  Nos últimos anos, no entanto, aparecem doenças não músculoesqueléticas condições incluindo câncer, síndrome metabólica, infecciosas e doenças autoimunes, esclerose múltipla, doenças que também foram encontrados associados aos baixos níveis de vitamina D. O Aumento da prevalência de distúrbios ligados à deficiência de vitamina D, é refletida no aumento do numero de crianças doentes.

Epidemias crescem se não for dada nutrição adequada e suplementos á toda população. Este é o cuidado que o governo brasileiro deve ter com todas as pessoas, indistintamente, em todas as idades.

Dilma e Lula não sabem disso, e desde 2008 favorecem pesquisas com células de embriões e abortos.

“É interessante notar que as geografias de raquitismo (Hess, 1929) e MS são muito semelhantes, a geografia do raquitismo levou Sniadecki (citado por Holick, 1995) para sugerir em 1822 que o sol pode curar o raquitismo. Lamentavelmente, diz Hayes, o raquitismo continuou a aleijar crianças por um século inteiro antes de investigadores demonstrarem os benefícios da luz solar ou óleo de fígado de bacalhau (Hess &amp; Unger, 1921; Chick et al. 1922). Hoje o óleo de fígado de bacalhau tornou-se a proteção do “inverno” para as crianças que vivem em latitudes setentrionais.”

Ver Vitamin D: a natural inhibitor of multiple sclerosis, de Collen Hayes:

     Disponivel em http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayFulltext?type=1&fid=796912&jid=PNS&volumeId=59&issueId=04&aid=796900

“A evidência de que a vitamina D pode ser um inibidor natural de MS ou E.M. é irresistível. Examinando o benefício da suplementação de vitamina D para a prevenção de MS, a recusa desta verdade vai exigir um grande esforço por parte da comunidade científica, mas é claramente justificada diante dos atuais investimentos político-economicos”, diz Collen Hayes.

Ver Vitamin D: a natural inhibitor of multiple sclerosis, de Collen Hayes:

     Disponivel em http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayFulltext?type=1&fid=796912&jid=PNS&volumeId=59&issueId=04&aid=796900—-

 

As pessoas que têm doenças como Alzheimer, esclerose múltipla, lúpus, hipo e hipertireoidismo, artrite, vitiligo, diabetes, câncer e outras doenças autoimunitárias, hoje são orientadas por médicos e pesquisadores a consumir a solução oleosa [óleo de girassol ou oliva] de colecalciferol, a vitamina D3. A 25hidroxivitamin D3 é de fácil absorção pelo organismo. Passando do fígado aos rins e, depois de transformada em ativa, é absorvida por todas as células de todos os tecidos do corpo humano, como cálcio, fósforo e outras substancias, fortalecendo e recuperando inclusive o tecido neural.

 

A DEFICIENCIA ou INSUFICIENCIA DA VITAMINA D é verificada em exame de sangue, o 25[OH]D3 que o sistema de saúde publica do Brasil não oferece. O consenso entre os médicos definiu a medida da nanoterapia como ideal acima de 50. Abaixo de 50 já existe deficiencia mesmo que a pessoa ainda não apresente qualquer sintoma de doença. Isto significa que há meio de baixo custo para a prevenção de epidemias. A suplementação e reposição da colecalciferol, a vitamina D3, deve ser feita em altas doses. Muito alem das convencionadas 30 mg pela medicina do passado, para ter uma idéia uma gota da solução de colecalciferol tem 1.000 UI [unidade internacional].               

 

E há SIM UM DISTURBIO METABOLICO, pois, se as pessoas com resultado do exame de sangue abaixo de 50, já estiverem recebendo alimentação apropriada, existe indicio de dificuldade digestiva na absorção dos alimentos, depressão, estresse e tristeza que impedem a neurogenesis.   

 

“Revisando-se a literatura, verificamos que a carne vermelha libera, durante a digestão, a substância hemina, que possui propriedades tóxicas, porque penetra as membranas celulares carregando ferro para o interior das células, onde este eleva a produção de radicais livres. Para evitar tal efeito, a hemina é destruída, em sua maior parte, na própria célula intestinal (e o restante, no fígado), utilizando a vitamina B2. Tornou-se claro, então, que o indivíduo absorve a hemina, não tendo então a B2 para destruí-la. Assim, solicitamos a parada completa da ingestão de carne”. Coimbra acrescenta que o tratamento tradicional contra a doença, à base de medicamentos, deve ser concomitante à dieta proposta pelos pesquisadores.

 […]

SBPC/Labjor – Brasil 

Disponível em http://www.comciencia.br/noticias/2003/06jun03/parkinson.htm

——

 

Vitamina D pode revolucionar o tratamento da esclerose múltipla*

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2010/08/03/vitamina-d-pode-revolucionar-o-tratamento-da-esclerose-multipla/

*Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra
PHD Médico Neurologista e Professor Livre-Docente

 

 Informações médicas sobre a prevenção e tratamento de doenças neurodegenerativas e autoimunes, como Parkinson, Alzheimer, Lupus, Psoríase, Vitiligo, depressão

Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra
PHD Médico Neurologista e Professor Livre-Docente         

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/category/doencas-autoimunes/

 

Sistema nervoso – 06/02/2009. Entrevista com Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra. Evitar o envelhecimento e a perda de neuronios.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRQkITHjZ5k&feature=player_embedded# —-

                                        

a situação fundamental é a mesma: a existência de um DISTÚRBIO METABÓLICO evidente e corrigível, capaz de explicar os eventos fisiopatológicos conhecidos, e cuja correção pode deter a progressão da doença (interrompendo a continuidade da morte neuronal crônica, recuperando células neuronais já afetadas pelo processo neurodegenerativo – mas que não atingiram ainda o ponto de irreversibilidade), promover a recuperação total em casos de início recente, ou ao menos parcial das deficiências neurológicas nos casos mais avançados (minimizando seqüelas permanentes) e impedir a morte.” [1]

[1] Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra
PHD Médico Neurologista e Professor Livre-Docente
Departamento de Neurologia e Neurocirurgia – Universidade Federal de São Paulo – Unifesp/EPM – Sofrimento emocional. – Em defesa da administração de doses elevadas de riboflavina associada à eliminação dos fatores desencadeantes no tratamento (…).

 

Disponivel em
http://www.unifesp.br/dneuro/nexp/riboflavina/

—-

Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra
PHD Médico Neurologista e Professor Livre-Docente         

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/category/doencas-autoimunes/

—-

 

Vitamin D: a natural inhibitor of multiple sclerosis     From Colleen E. Hayes Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 433 Babcock

Disponivel em http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayFulltext?type=1&fid=796912&jid=PNS&volumeId=59&issueId=04&aid=796900——

 

Vitamin D: its role and uses in immunology  

HECTOR F. DELUCA2 and MARGHERITA T. CANTORNA*

Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA; and

* Department of Nutrition, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA

http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/full/15/14/2579   http://www.drtheo.com/vitaminD/documents/VitaminD-itsroleandusesinimmunology.pdf

 (The FASEB Journal. 2001;15:2579-2585.)

—-

 

High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and reduced bone mass in multiple sclerosis

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-david-perlmutter-md/vitamin-d-benefits_b_818912.html

High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and reduced bone mass in multiple sclerosis

  1. J. Nieves, PhD,

  2. F. Cosman, MD,

  3. J. Herbert, MD,

  4. V. Shen, PhD and

  5. R. Lindsay, MD

—-

 

Vitamin D and the immune system: new perspectives on an old theme

Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2010 June; 39(2):

365–379.

Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 June 1.Published in final edited form as:Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2010 June; 39(2): 365–379. doi:  10.1016/j.ecl.2010.02.010

 

Martin Hewison, PhD

Martin Hewison, Professor in Residence, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 615 Charles E. Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA;

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2879394/?tool=pubmed

—-

 

Lack of Vitamin D Linked to Alzheimer’s and Vascular Dementia

Friday, June 05, 2009 by: Sherry Baker, Health Sciences Editor

Sherry Baker is a widely published writer whose work has appeared in Newsweek, Health, the Atlanta Journal and Constitution, Yoga Journal, Optometry, Atlanta, Arthritis Today, Natural Healing Newsletter, OMNI, UCLA’s “Healthy Years” newsletter, Mount Sinai School of Medicine’s “Focus on Health Aging” newsletter, the Cleveland Clinic’s “Men’s Health Advisor” newsletter and many others.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/026392_Vitamin_D_Alzheimers_disease.html#ixzz3HnBD71Qg

http://www.naturalnews.com/026392_Vitamin_D_Alzheimers_disease.html        

—-

 

Factors in human vitamin D nutrition and in the production and cure of classical rickets Sítio canadense sobre e.m. DIRECT-MS

Fatores nutricionais e suplementares relacionados à esclerose múltipla. http://www.direct-ms.org/

—-

 

“It is plausible that some 200 cases a year of MS might be prevented in Scotland alone by giving vitamin D to mothers and children,” he wrote.


disponivel em http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/health/article5663483.eceVitamin D is ray of sunshine for multiple sclerosis patient

—-

 

 Vitamin D in preventive medicine: are we ignoring the evidence? Vitamin D in preventive medicine: are we ignoring the evidence? A vitamina D em medicina preventiva: estamos ignorando as provas? Vitamina D em medicina preventiva: estamos ignorando as provas?

Dispoível em

http://64.233.163.132/translate_c?hl=pt-BR&langpair=en%7Cpt&u=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12720576&prev=/translate_s%3Fhl%3Dpt-BR%26q%3DVitamina%2BD%2Be%2Bdepress%25C3%25A3o%26sl%3Dpt%26tl%3Den&rurl=translate.google.com.br&usg=ALkJrhjspQEBlxCMyClVGNWHjrZsYK2BOA

Vitamin D supplementation: Recommendations for Canadian mothers and infants. A suplementação de vitamina D: Recomendações para as mães e bebês canadenses.. Paediatr Child Health. . Paediatr Child Health. 2007 Sep; 12(7):583-98. 2007 Sep; 12 (7) :583-98.[Paediatr Child Health. [Paediatr Child Health. 2007] 2007]

Review Vitamin D and disease prevention with special reference to cardiovascular disease. Review vitamina D e prevenção de doenças, com especial referência à doença cardiovascular.Prog Biophys Mol Biol. Prog Biophys Mol Biol. 2006 Sep; 92(1):39-48. 2006 Sep; 92 (1) :39-48. Epub 2006 Feb 28. Epub 2006 Feb 28.[Prog Biophys Mol Biol. [Prog Biophys Mol Biol. 2006] 2006]

 

Vitamin D in health and disease. Vitamina D na saúde e na doença.Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2008 Sep; 3(5):1535-41. 2008 Sep; 3 (5) :1535-41. Epub 2008 Jun 4. Epub 2008 Jun 4.[Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. [Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2008] 2008]

Review Sunlight and vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease. Review Luz solar e vitamina D para a saúde óssea e prevenção de doenças auto-imunes, câncer e doenças cardiovasculares.Am J Clin Nutr. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec; 80(6 Suppl):1678S-88S. 2004 Dec; 80 (6 Suppl): 1678S-88S.[Am J Clin Nutr. [Am J Clin Nutr. 2004] 2004]

 —-

 

A cura e prevenção em todas idades. Epidemia global por insuficiencia de vitamina D no sangue e má nutrição. Depressão, doenças autoimunes e neurodegenerativas, câncer, diabetes, artrite reumatóide, Alzheimer, multiple sclerosis, psoriase, hipertireoidismo, hipotireoidismo, lupus, vitiligo..

COLLEN HAYES esclarece a insuficiencia da herança genética para a evolução da doença e a nítida deficiencia da vit D que deve ser suplementada para evitar a doença e.m.

A herança genética de fatores de risco para a esclerose múltipla (MS) não é suficiente para causar a doença desmielinizante do sistema nervoso central. A exposição a fatores de risco, fatores ambientais como a nutrição pobre em Vitamina D e regiões onde há baixa radiação solar, desenvolvem esclerose múltipla.

Evidencias consistentes com essa hipótese vêm não só dos estudos geográficos, mas também de estudos genéticos e biológicos. Óleo de peixe é uma excelente fonte de vitamina D. A deficiência de vitamina D aflige a maioria dos pacientes com esclerose múltipla, como ficou demonstrado pela sua baixa massa óssea e elevados índices de fraturas. No entanto, a mais clara evidencia de que a vitamina D é um inibidor natural da E.M. ou M.S. vem de experiencias com encefalomielite autoimune.

Pacientes com esclerose múltipla, como ficou demonstrado pela sua baixa massa óssea e elevados índices de faturas, TÊM a mais clara evidencia de que a vitamina D pode ser um inibidor natural da doença.

insuficiência de vitamina D no sangue.

O status da vitamina D é mais confiável determinado pelo ensaio de soro de 25-hidroxivitamina D (25-OHD). O consenso entre os médicos definiu a medida da nanoterapia como ideal acima de 50. Abaixo de 50 já existe deficiencia mesmo que a pessoa ainda não apresente qualquer sintoma de doença. Isto significa que há meio de baixo custo para a prevenção de epidemias. A suplementação e reposição da colecalciferol, a vitamina D3 a vitamina D3, deve ser feita em altas doses. Muito alem das convencionadas mg da medicina do passado, para ter uma idéia uma gota da solução de colecalciferol tem 1.000 UI [unidade internacional].

É interessante notar que as geografias de raquitismo (Hess, 1929) e MS são muito semelhantes, a geografia do raquitismo levou Sniadecki (citado por Holick, 1995) para sugerir em 1822 que o sol pode curar o raquitismo. Lamentavelmente, diz Hayes, o raquitismo continuou a aleijar crianças por um século inteiro antes de investigadores demonstrarem os benefícios da luz solar ou óleo de fígado de bacalhau (Hess &amp; Unger, 1921; Chick et al. 1922). Hoje o óleo de fígado de bacalhau tornou-se a proteção do “inverno” para as crianças que vivem em latitudes setentrionais. Ver Vitamin D: a natural inhibitor of multiple sclerosis, de Collen Hayes:

Disponivel em http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayFulltext?type=1&fid=796912&jid=PNS&volumeId=59&issueId=04&aid=796900

A evidência de que a vitamina D pode ser um inibidor natural de MS ou E.M. é irresistível. Examinando o benefício da suplementação de vitamina D para a prevenção de MS, a recusa desta verdade vai exigir um grande esforço por parte da comunidade científica, mas é claramente justificada diante dos atuais investimentos político-economicos, diz Hayes.

MUITOS AUTORES EXPÕEM PESQUISA NO MESMO SENTIDO

Lembro quando da noticia destas pesquisas. Há quem escreveu, li na internet, que isto não é verdade. Porem, “The role of vitamin D in multiple sclerosis” é pesquisa acompanhada de centenas e milhares de outras varias em idêntico sentido. Milhares de doutores, de todos os países do planeta, vêm mostrando a importancia da vitamina D para outras doenças também, muito alem da esclerose múltipla. Basta fazer pesquisa e escrever: vitamin d multiple sclerosis  ou vitamin d Alzheimer ou o mesmo com qualquer outra patollogia que se pretenda pesquisar, câncer, diabetes, artrite reumatoide, psoriase, hipertireoidismo, hipotireoidismo, lupus, vitiligo, e muitas outras.

A internet brasileira já tem alguma informação em portugues. Aqui no Brasil, o primeiro médico a oferecer este conhecimento publicamente foi Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra  [PHD Médico Neurologista e Professor Livre-Docente,  Departamento de Neurologia e Neurocirurgia – Universidade Federal de São Paulo – Unifesp/EPM]. Alguns artigos e entrevista com Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra:
 

 

Vitamina D é importantíssima para a saúde

Disponível em http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/category/a-prevencao-de-doencas-neurodegenerativas/

 

Vitamina D pode revolucionar o tratamento da esclerose múltipla*

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2010/08/03/vitamina-d-pode-revolucionar-o-tratamento-da-esclerose-multipla/

*Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra
PHD Médico Neurologista e Professor Livre-Docente

 

A cura com Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra. Estresse emocional, depressão, doenças autoimunes e neurodegenerativas. A importancia da Vitamina D.

“Comentário: a principal razão pela qual a medicina atual desdenha estes importantes conhecimentos médicos já antigos e com ampla fundamentação na história recente da medicina e confirmados em vários países, através de diversas publicações, é simplesmente porque ela está subordinada aos interesses extremamente gananciosos da indústria farmacêutica internacional.”

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2011/03/23/informacoes-medicas-sobre-a-prevencao-e-tratamento-de-doencas-neurodegenerativas-e-auto-imunes-como-parkinson-alzheimer-lupus-psoriase-vitiligo-depressao/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRQkITHjZ5k&feature=player_embedded#

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/category/doencas-autoimunes/

—-

O que é possível dizer em breves palavras, já oferece um quadro preocupante. A insuficiência de vitamina D tem desenvolvido muitas outras doenças alem do raquitismo e da osteoporose que já são aceitas como “comuns” e típicas da medicina das doenças crônicas. Associadas á deficiencia de vitamina D estão o câncer, as diabetes, problemas cardiovasculares, transtorno bipolar, autismo, mal de Alzheimer e esquizofrenia, psoríase, depressão.  O comercio industrial multimilionário da farmácia, não traz a cura, apresenta medicação cara e talvez paliativa. Diz assim a medicina das doenças crônicas: “a sua doença não tem cura”… E, no entanto, todas essas doenças graves sequer teriam desenvolvido nas pessoas, se existisse o cuidado com a medicina preventiva com a suplementação da vitamina D.

 Os médicos vêm apresentando pesquisa que aponta o aumento de epidemias em todo planeta, por causa da falta de investimento dos governos em saúde preventiva com suplementação da vitamina D.

Vitamin D deficiency: a global perspective https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/vitamin-d-deficiency-a-global-perspective/ https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/vitamin-d-deficiency-a-global-perspective/ https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/vitamin-d-deficiency-a-global-perspective/

Deficiência de vitamina D: uma epidemia global

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/deficiencia-de-vitamina-d-uma-epidemia-global/

 

Symposium: Vitamin D Insufficiency: A Significant Risk Factor in Chronic Diseases and Potential Disease-Specific Biomarkers of Vitamin D Sufficiency Vitamin D Intake: A Global Perspective of Current Status

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/symposium-vitamin-d-insufficiency-a-significant-risk-factor-in-chronic-diseases-and-potential-disease-specific-biomarkers-of-vitamin-d-sufficiency-vitamin-d-intake-a-global-perspective-of-current-s/

Brasil ainda investe pouco em saúde País investe apenas 8,7% do valor arrecadado com impostos em saúde. Número é inferior ao de países como Argentina, Chile e Venezuela Um estudo realizado pela Fundação Instituto de Administração da Universidade de São Paulo (USP)

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/08/05/brasil-ainda-investe-pouco-em-saude/

 

O aumento da Deficiência de vitamina D geralmente se apresentava como deformidade óssea (raquitismo) ou hipocalcemia na infância e como dor músculoesquelética e fraqueza em adultos.

Hoje os estudos são avançados e os médicos constataram muitos outros problemas de saúde, incluindo doenças cardiovasculares, diabetes, vários tipos de câncer, e autoimunes como mal de Alzheimer e esclerose múltipla, hipo e hipertireoidismo, artrite, vitiligo,associadas á alta insuficiência de vitamina D no sangue.

O status da vitamina D é mais confiável determinado pelo ensaio de soro de 25-hidroxivitamina D (25-OHD).

O consenso entre os médicos definiu a medida da nanoterapia como ideal acima de 50. Abaixo de 50 já existe deficiencia mesmo que a pessoa ainda não apresente qualquer sintoma de doença. Isto significa que há meio de baixo custo para a prevenção de epidemias. A suplementação e reposição da colecalciferol, a vitamina D3 a vitamina D3, deve ser feita em altas doses. Muito alem das convencionadas mg da medicina do passado, para ter uma idéia uma gota da solução de colecalciferol tem 1.000 UI [unidade internacional].               

O espectro dessas doenças comuns e graves, é particularmente preocupante porque os estudos observacionais têm demonstrado que a insuficiência de vitamina D, Raquitismo em crianças e osteomalacia em adultos são apenas manifestações clássicas de deficiência de vitamina D profunda.  Nos últimos anos, no entanto, aparecem doenças não músculoesqueléticas condições incluindo câncer, síndrome metabólica, infecciosas e doenças autoimunes, esclerose múltipla também foram encontrados associados aos baixos níveis de vitamina D. O Aumento da prevalência de distúrbios ligados à deficiência de vitamina D, é refletida no aumento do numero de crianças doentes.

Epidemias crescem se não for dada nutrição adequada e suplementos á toda população. Este é o cuidado que o governo brasileiro deve ter com todas as pessoas, indistintamente, em todas as idades.

Dilma e Lula não sabem disso, e desde 2008 favorecem pesquisas com células de embriões e abortos. Ver:

A inconstitucionalidade da tramitação de legislação legalizadora do aborto no Brasil por Celso Galli Coimbra

Pode o juiz autorizar um aborto? – Por Pe. Luiz Carlos Lodi da Cruz

Tráfico de órgãos é terceiro crime organizado mais lucrativo no mundo, segundo Polícia Federal. Veja mais detalhes em Biodireito Medicina sobre este crime internacional e o Brasil.

 —

Tráfico de órgãos pode movimentar US$ 13 bilhões por ano

 —

Industria do aborto BLOOD MONEY the multi-million dollar abortion industry

Aborto legalizado e transplantes de fetos

O PNDH-3 PREVE A LIBERAÇÃO DE CRIMES, fim do Estado de Direito.

A Advocacia Geral da União pode defender aborto de feto anencéfalo no STF?

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2009/04/09/agu-defende-aborto-de-feto-anencefalo-no-stf/

09/04/2009 —  por Celso Galli Coimbra

“a AGU (Advocacia Geral da União) não é paga com dinheiro público para defender o descumprimento da Convenção Americana de Direitos Humanos que integra o rol de direitos humanos do constitucionalismo brasileiro como cláusula pétrea e, portanto, imune até mesmo a uma reforma constitucional(PECs).  Muito menos é paga para obter — por ignorância ou não — a  legitimação da criminosa Resolução 1752/2004 do CFM, através da ADPF 54, que autoriza a retirada de órgãos dos anencéfalos depois de nascidos e, em seus considerandos, altera maliciosamente a declaração de morte para todos no Brasil para um conceito de “morte” que nunca existiu na medicina: é uma ficção homicida que vai atingir todos os brasileiros com vida e saúde também.”

“Além disto, a citada Resolução do CFM — uma vez legitimada — “institucionaliza” o próspero mercado do tráfico de órgãos humanos no Brasil, quando obviamente ensejará a negociação do nascimento de anencéfalo para poder retirar-lhe os órgãos.”

“Falar no “principio da legalidade” de parte da AGU sobre este assunto é anedótico, quando ela defende o desrespeito às normas de maior hierarquia deste país.”

 

—-

Referencias:

Diagnóstico e tratamento da deficiência de vitamina D

BMJ 2010; 340: b5664 doi: 10.1136/bmj.b5664 (Publicado em 11 de janeiro de 2010)
Citam isso como: BMJ 2010; 340: b5664

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2011/07/04/diagnostico-e-tratamento-da-deficiencia-de-vitamina-d/

—-

“Professor Ebers, in an article in The Times, backed the idea of distributing vitamin D supplements in Scotland to guard against conditions that may be linked to a deficiency, including MS.”

“It is plausible that some 200 cases a year of MS might be prevented in Scotland alone by giving vitamin D to mothers and children,” he wrote.

disponivel em http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/health/article5663483.ece-—-

Vitamin D is ray of sunshine for multiple sclerosis patient from Melanie Reid and Olive Gillie

THE MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS CENTRE
http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseaction/show/pageid/1334www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseaction/show/pageid/1334
traduçao do Google:
http://translate.google.com.br/translate?hl=pt-BR&sl=en&u=http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseaction/show/pageid/1334&ei=WOAgS-TRNY6muAfY6-zKCg&sa=X&oi=translate&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CBcQ7gEwAg&prev=/search%3Fq%3DVitamin%2BD%2B-%2Bthe%2Blink%2Bthat%2Blacked%2Bfor%2Bpatients%2Bwith%2Bmultiple%2Bsclerosis.%26hl%3Dpt-BR

—-

Tasmania has the highest rate of MS in the country. Tasmânia tem a maior taxa de MS no país.
The link between vitamin D

THE MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS CENTRE
http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseaction/show/pageid/1334

www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseaction/show/pageid/1334
traduçao do Google:
http://translate.google.com.br/translate?hl=pt-BR&sl=en&u=http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseaction/show/pageid/1334&ei=WOAgS-TRNY6muAfY6-zKCg&sa=X&oi=translate&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CBcQ7gEwAg&prev=/search%3Fq%3DVitamin%2BD%2B-%2Bthe%2Blink%2Bthat%2Blacked%2Bfor%2Bpatients%2Bwith%2Bmultiple%2Bsclerosis.%26hl%3Dpt-BR

—-

Australian scientists have found that Vitamin D may slow the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS).

THE MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS CENTRE
http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseaction/show/pageid/1334www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseaction/show/pageid/1334
traduçao do Google:
http://translate.google.com.br/translate?hl=pt-BR&sl=en&u=http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseaction/show/pageid/1334&ei=WOAgS-TRNY6muAfY6-zKCg&sa=X&oi=translate&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CBcQ7gEwAg&prev=/search%3Fq%3DVitamin%2BD%2B-%2Bthe%2Blink%2Bthat%2Blacked%2Bfor%2Bpatients%2Bwith%2Bmultiple%2Bsclerosis.%26hl%3Dpt-BR

 

Vitamin D in health and disease. Vitamina D na saúde e na doença.Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2008 Sep; 3(5):1535-41. 2008 Sep; 3 (5) :1535-41. Epub 2008 Jun 4.  Review Sunlight and vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease. Review Luz solar e vitamina D para a saúde óssea e prevenção de doenças auto-imunes, câncer e doenças cardiovasculares.Am J Clin Nutr. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec; 80(6 Suppl):1678S-88S. 2004 Dec; 80 (6 Suppl): 1678S-88S.[Am J Clin Nutr. [Am J Clin Nutr. 2004] 2004]

Review Vitamin D and disease prevention with special reference to cardiovascular disease. Review vitamina D e prevenção de doenças, com especial referência à doença cardiovascular.Prog Biophys Mol Biol. Prog Biophys Mol Biol. 2006 Sep; 92(1):39-48. 2006 Sep; 92 (1) :39-48. Epub 2006 Feb 28. Epub 2006 Feb 28.[Prog Biophys Mol Biol. [Prog Biophys Mol Biol. 2006] 2006]

Vitamin D supplementation: Recommendations for Canadian mothers and infants. A suplementação de vitamina D: Recomendações para as mães e bebês canadenses.. Paediatr Child Health. . Paediatr Child Health. 2007 Sep; 12(7):583-98. 2007 Sep; 12 (7) :583-98.[Paediatr Child Health. [Paediatr Child Health. 2007] 2007]

Vitamin D in preventive medicine: are we ignoring the evidence? Vitamin D in preventive medicine: are we ignoring the evidence? A vitamina D em medicina preventiva: estamos ignorando as provas? Vitamina D em medicina preventiva: estamos ignorando as provas?

Disponível em

http://64.233.163.132/translate_c?hl=pt-BR&langpair=en%7Cpt&u=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12720576&prev=/translate_s%3Fhl%3Dpt-BR%26q%3DVitamina%2BD%2Be%2Bdepress%25C3%25A3o%26sl%3Dpt%26tl%3Den&rurl=translate.google.com.br&usg=ALkJrhjspQEBlxCMyClVGNWHjrZsYK2BOA—–

A vitamina D influencia o metabolismo de enzimas importantes da imunidade e da função neural protegendo o sistema nervoso.

Imunoregulador natural e com ação antiinflamatória, a suplementação em solução de vitamina D tem papel fundamental na regulação da Esclerose Múltipla – EM ou MS.

—-

Basic Supplements – Essentials

http://www.direct-ms.org/supplements.html,

 A daily regimen of supplements is an important part of the nutritional strategies for MS. The basic recommendations below are completely safe and have the potential to be of significant benefit.

—-

A cura e prevençao em todas as idades. Doenças neurodegenerativas e autoimunes. Alzheimer, lupus, vitiligo, esclerose multipla, diabetes, cancer

O que os cientistas e pesquisadores têm certeza há anos, a contar dos primeiros anos da década de 2000, é da importancia da vitamina D para doenças autoimunes. Porque, como muitos explicaram,  Collen Hayes e Cícero Galli Coimbra, dentre cientistas por exemplo, foi preciso descobrir o motivo porque, mesmo em territórios de clima temperado, alguns grupos de pessoas desenvolviam esclerose múltipla e outros não. Alimentação apropriada foi a explicação. O alto consumo de peixes de águas geladas, cuja gordura é rica em Vitamina D, Omega3, como também o consumo de óleo de fígado de bacalhau, forneceu ao sangue humano a hormona 25hidroxivitamin D e as pessoas não desenvolveram nem raquitismo nem esclerose múltipla, embora tivessem a herança genética da doença. Hoje já se sabe que a vitamina D é o link que faltava também para o Alzheimer.

 

As pessoas que têm doenças como Alzheimer, esclerose múltipla, lúpus, hipo e hipertireoidismo, artrite, vitiligo, diabetes, câncer e outras doenças autoimunitárias, hoje são orientadas por médicos e pesquisadores a consumir a solução oleosa [óleo de girassol ou oliva] de colecalciferol, a vitamina D3. A 25hidroxivitamin D3 é de fácil absorção pelo organismo. Passando do fígado aos rins e, depois de transformada em ativa, é absorvida por todas as células de todos os tecidos do corpo humano, como cálcio, fósforo e outras substancias, fortalecendo e recuperando inclusive o tecido neural.

 

A DEFICIENCIA ou INSUFICIENCIA DA VITAMINA D é verificada em exame de sangue, o 25[OH]D3 que o sistema de saúde publica do Brasil não oferece. O consenso entre os médicos definiu a medida da nanoterapia como ideal acima de 50. Abaixo de 50 já existe deficiencia mesmo que a pessoa ainda não apresente qualquer sintoma de doença. Isto significa que há meio de baixo custo para a prevenção de epidemias. A suplementação e reposição da colecalciferol, a vitamina D3, deve ser feita em altas doses. Muito alem das convencionadas 30 mg pela medicina do passado, para ter uma idéia uma gota da solução de colecalciferol tem 1.000 UI [unidade internacional].               

 

E há SIM UM DISTURBIO METABOLICO, pois, se as pessoas com resultado do exame de sangue abaixo de 50, já estiverem recebendo alimentação apropriada, existe indicio de dificuldade digestiva na absorção dos alimentos, depressão, estresse e tristeza que impedem a neurogenesis.

 

“Revisando-se a literatura, verificamos que a carne vermelha libera, durante a digestão, a substância hemina, que possui propriedades tóxicas, porque penetra as membranas celulares carregando ferro para o interior das células, onde este eleva a produção de radicais livres. Para evitar tal efeito, a hemina é destruída, em sua maior parte, na própria célula intestinal (e o restante, no fígado), utilizando a vitamina B2. Tornou-se claro, então, que o indivíduo absorve a hemina, não tendo então a B2 para destruí-la. Assim, solicitamos a parada completa da ingestão de carne”. Coimbra acrescenta que o tratamento tradicional contra a doença, à base de medicamentos, deve ser concomitante à dieta proposta pelos pesquisadores.

 

[…]

SBPC/Labjor – Brasil 

Disponível em http://www.comciencia.br/noticias/2003/06jun03/parkinson.htm

——

 

Vitamina D pode revolucionar o tratamento da esclerose múltipla*

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/2010/08/03/vitamina-d-pode-revolucionar-o-tratamento-da-esclerose-multipla/

*Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra
PHD Médico Neurologista e Professor Livre-Docente

 

 Informações médicas sobre a prevenção e tratamento de doenças neurodegenerativas e autoimunes, como Parkinson, Alzheimer, Lupus, Psoríase, Vitiligo, depressão

Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra
PHD Médico Neurologista e Professor Livre-Docente         

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/category/doencas-autoimunes/

Sistema nervoso – 06/02/2009. Entrevista com Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra. Evitar o envelhecimento e a perda de neuronios.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRQkITHjZ5k&feature=player_embedded# —-

                                        

a situação fundamental é a mesma: a existência de um distúrbio metabólico evidente e corrigível, capaz de explicar os eventos fisiopatológicos conhecidos, e cuja correção pode deter a progressão da doença (interrompendo a continuidade da morte neuronal crônica, recuperando células neuronais já afetadas pelo processo neurodegenerativo – mas que não atingiram ainda o ponto de irreversibilidade), promover a recuperação total em casos de início recente, ou ao menos parcial das deficiências neurológicas nos casos mais avançados (minimizando seqüelas permanentes) e impedir a morte.” [1]

[1] Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra
PHD Médico Neurologista e Professor Livre-Docente
Departamento de Neurologia e Neurocirurgia – Universidade Federal de São Paulo – Unifesp/EPM – Sofrimento emocional. – Em defesa da administração de doses elevadas de riboflavina associada à eliminação dos fatores desencadeantes no tratamento (…).

Disponivel em
http://www.unifesp.br/dneuro/nexp/riboflavina/

—-

 

 Informações médicas sobre a prevenção e tratamento de doenças neurodegenerativas e autoimunes, como Parkinson, Alzheimer, Lupus, Psoríase, Vitiligo, depressão

Dr. Cícero Galli Coimbra
PHD Médico Neurologista e Professor Livre-Docente         

http://biodireitomedicina.wordpress.com/category/doencas-autoimunes/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRQkITHjZ5k&feature=player_embedded# —-

Vitamin D: a natural inhibitor of multiple sclerosis     From Colleen E. Hayes Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 433 Babcock

Em portugues:

https://objetodignidade.wordpress.com/2012/02/19/vitamin-d-a-natural-inhibitor-of-multiple-sclerosis/

—-

Vitamin D: its role and uses in immunology  

HECTOR F. DELUCA2 and MARGHERITA T. CANTORNA*

Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA; and

* Department of Nutrition, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA

http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/full/15/14/2579   http://www.drtheo.com/vitaminD/documents/VitaminD-itsroleandusesinimmunology.pdf

 (The FASEB Journal. 2001;15:2579-2585.)

—-

 

 

High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and reduced bone mass in multiple sclerosis

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-david-perlmutter-md/vitamin-d-benefits_b_818912.html

High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and reduced bone mass in multiple sclerosis

  1. J. Nieves, PhD,
  2. F. Cosman, MD,
  3. J. Herbert, MD,
  4. V. Shen, PhD and
  5. R. Lindsay, MD

—-

Vitamin D and the immune system: new perspectives on an old theme

Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2010 June; 39(2):

365–379.

Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2011 June 1.Published in final edited form as:Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2010 June; 39(2): 365–379. doi:  10.1016/j.ecl.2010.02.010

Copyright notice and Disclaimer

Martin Hewison, PhD

Martin Hewison, Professor in Residence, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 615 Charles E. Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA;

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2879394/?tool=pubmed

—-

 

Lack of Vitamin D Linked to Alzheimer’s and Vascular Dementia

Friday, June 05, 2009 by: Sherry Baker, Health Sciences Editor

Sherry Baker is a widely published writer whose work has appeared in Newsweek, Health, the Atlanta Journal and Constitution, Yoga Journal, Optometry, Atlanta, Arthritis Today, Natural Healing Newsletter, OMNI, UCLA’s “Healthy Years” newsletter, Mount Sinai School of Medicine’s “Focus on Health Aging” newsletter, the Cleveland Clinic’s “Men’s Health Advisor” newsletter and many others.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/026392_Vitamin_D_Alzheimers_disease.html#ixzz3HnBD71Qg

http://www.naturalnews.com/026392_Vitamin_D_Alzheimers_disease.html        

—-

 

 

 

%d blogueiros gostam disto: